talking at the speed of lightning

I give so-called “lightning talks” at San Diego JS, a four-times-per-month local group on Meetup.com. Each talk only lasts five minutes so there’s time for several speakers within the span of a single event.

The venue is typically packed. Here’s a photograph of a typical turnout—there were about 120 attendees this month alone.

I suppose you can communicate a lot in a mere five minutes. It is a bit challenging to try to distill down all the things you need to say into this timeframe. There’s really no room for story-telling, just tell the straight facts and details as you race through your slides and screenshots and nothing more. At best, you can hope that someone will ask a relevant question which may allow you to go into some detail you’d earlier hoped to have included.

Challenges

Many of my projects involve more than one computer. Unfortunately, the security settings on most wi-fi routers at venues like this don’t want you to connect from one computer to the next. The router would actively prevent your demo from working. So I’ve learned to bring along my own networking, which is a hassle. This is especially difficult with IoT projects, for what it’s worth.

Another challenge is related to power. It seems like each of the speakers needs to setup prior to the event and so they all want to bring along their power adapters and plug in. This means that the venue would need to accommodate all those brick-style adapters and they usually forget this.

And I suppose, a recurring problem is that of screen resolution compromises that you have to put up with. You will have formatted all your screens for one resolution while creating your content, only to find that you’re now presenting in a smaller resolution. This then threatens to clip off content or the font size is now too small to be seen by those near the back.

Regardless, it’s a rewarding experience and I hope to give more talks in the months to come. I would encourage others to do the same. It’s a great opportunity to give back to the community of like-minded coders.

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o please, gentlemen, a little bluer…

Today’s inventiveness involves a new teaching method for music, a synesthetic approach to colorizing musical notes. The title’s quote comes from Franz Liszt, a 19th-century composer who was a synesthete—he saw music in full color.

Although western doctors probably think of synesthesia as a malady, I would suggest that it is a product of beneficial neuroplasticity. The brain has cross-wired itself across the senses to allow for better recognition and appreciation of something. There’s a long list of famous musicians and composers who wrote of this personal condition and in each case it helped them to succeed.

vexflow-syn

In order to promote this cross-wiring in young musical students, I’ve created a repository to colorize musical notes in client-side JavaScript. I’ve developed an organized method for this and have described the process there.

Compatibility

Given that the client-side JavaScript approach requires the newer HTML5 canvas features, this will work on newer browsers (and seems to be working in IE11 if you “allow blocked content”).

Musical Talent

I have always had a fondness and an early aptitude for music. In fact, I had such a brilliant audible memory and an ability to play anything I’d just heard, that I used this as a crutch when confronted with the task of learning to read musical notation. I didn’t actually have to read the notation in band since the sound of the music was in my head. So although I was a slow reader with respect to notation, nobody actually could tell.

My earliest formal training was for the saxophone, noting of course that you only play a single note at a time. Unfortunately, this led to my later difficulties in learning to play the piano in my thirties. Piano chords on a stave? To me, this just seemed like jumbles of notes piled on top of each other. I had no easy way of interpreting what I was seeing.

After many weeks of painstakingly trying to decypher these heiroglyphics, if you will, I began to have a small breakthrough. My brain started to recognize some patterns. Due to some unfortunate timing, I had to stop all this training and abruptly move and had to sell the piano. It would be another decade until I’d bought another piano to re-learn piano notation.

Attacking the learning of chords-in-notation anew, I realize that colorizing the notes would be a benefit to me.  All C notes are red.  All E notes are yellow.  C-E-G are primary colors (C-maj).  The Eb in the middle of the C-min chord is more orange than the original yellow. A synesthetic approach to musical notation is a wonderful adaptation to a centuries-old teaching methodology I’d suggest, at least in my own case.