don’t make me clamp you, part 3

Oh, the fun.  After a few fails, I managed to print out several C-shaped clamps in carbon fiber—infused PLA, finally getting the temperature right.  I then spent several more hours in Autodesk Fusion 360 to further tweak/finalize the bottom of the chassis for the Raspberry Pi 3 supercomputer and sent that off for a 56-hour print job.  Whoa.

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Four of these clamps then were employed during last night’s printout while it was still going.

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Unfortunately, the pause feature that I’d asked for in the slicing software went rogue upon resume and tried to bury the extruder into the plastic, forcing me to abort at 4am this morning.  <_<

At least there’s much less part curling at the base versus last time. So I think I’ll redesign the clamps to have an even lower top profile and clamp right after the first four layers of the raft are down.

 

don’t make me clamp you… (part 2)

You wouldn’t believe the difficulty I just had getting Autodesk Fusion 360 to do what I’d thought would be trivial: I wanted to cut down an existing part from Thingiverse to meet my needs.

Thingiverse ≠ OpenSource

The first thing I learned yesterday from this is that—even though Thingiverse seems like a wonderfully collaborative place—it isn’t actually open-source. If this were open-source, then in addition to the mesh (STL) files that are shared, each author would also include their project file as well (DWG, for example).

Don’t get me wrong, Thingiverse allows people to share their work. And yet, it isn’t the same as github which allows someone to take 100% of what you worked on, tweak it and then share that as well. It’s this iterative modification that makes open-source so powerful. And the reason behind that is that each new person doesn’t have to start from scratch.

CAD Project File

A typical computer-aided design file will include a variety of information. Most, though, are built around the concept of an initial sketch in two dimensions with a variety of measured constraints, for example. One then brings that 2D sketch into the third dimension and suddenly you have a part.

If you’d like to then edit the sketch or change the height of the sketch in that third dimension, you’d need to have that project file. (Thingiverse does not share project files.)

Mesh File

At the end of a design session, it would be necessary then to export that part into a 3D model which is usually a collection of points and triangular faces. The sum of these describes a solid in 3D space. (These STL files are shared on Thingiverse.)

Toolpaths File

Once you’ve exported your own design to an STL file (or you’ve downloaded one from someplace like Thingiverse), the file is taken into software like Cura if you’re trying to print to a 3D printer. This is known as “slicing” since it’s Cura’s job to know your printer well enough that it may slice your part from the bottom, up. Each layer then is converted into a number of instructions called G-code which tells the printer exactly what to do at every step of the way. (Thingiverse does not share these files either.)

Autodesk Wants You to Design in Autodesk

It was clear from my initial interaction with Autodesk’s support that they don’t want you to work using other software. They want you to start over and redesign your part in their software. Given that they charge $40/month to use the software, it’s easy to see why.

They actually do support the conversion of a mesh file into your project file in such a way that you can cut it, for example. They just hide the feature as an Easter Egg; only after turning off project journaling (Time Line) can you see the Mesh-to-BRep option. Granted, the program became painfully slow using this feature since it was grappling with about 50,000 triangular faces. Eventually, though, it processed the mesh file and I was able to apply the cutting action to remove some of the clamp from Thingiverse.

Progress So Far

Knowing that I could further modify the C part of the clamp should I need to, I then set the first of two prints into motion.

With the standard white PLA filament in the printer, I was able to print this in just over twelve hours last night. It’s a collection of eight screws plus their respective protector caps for the ends of those ball points. And tonight, I’ll print the C-shaped parts in black carbon fiber PLA for its added strength. (I’ll need to break them away from the adhesion raft, of course.)

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In case you’re wondering, I had to laboriously place each of the sixteen individual parts into Cura’s workplace, carefully including enough space between them. The tighter you bunch them, the less movement the printer will have to do and the faster it will print. Get them too close and the extruder might bump into one of the other parts or perhaps merge two parts together.

As you can see from the slight bit of raft curl on the right side in the second photo, these clamps in theory will do a nice job of holding the raft down into the bed for the first inch or so of the part’s printing. In some cases, they should save what would otherwise be a failed printout.

don’t make me clamp you…

Trying to push the envelope in print volume on the Robo C2 printer, I’m finding that the part wants to curl on the bed (since the latter isn’t heated). Hmm…

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This is a common occurrence, I understand.  It’s due to the uneven temperatures of plastic on the bed versus the new (hot) layers of added plastic. To get a part this big, I actually had to lie to the software and to suggest that the printer has a bigger range than this. This sort of tweaking is commonplace.

Hairspraying the bed is a known gimmick for 3D printing, but as you can see, the painter’s tape is well-stuck to the part.  Instead, I’m thinking of 1) printing the raft at the bottom, 2) pausing the print at this point, 3) removing the bed, 4) applying clamps around the edges and finally, 5) resuming the print job.

Tool-Making 101

From my experience in a plastic manufacturing plant, I learned that if something doesn’t work:  modify it, build a helper tool or change the process somehow so that it does work. Here, I’m opting to build a set of clamps to assist in the 3D print process and to insert a pause into those instructions (“GCODE”) at the proper moment.

Half the battle, then, is designing and building a number of clamps.  To be useful, they should allow their placement at a variety of distances from the edges of the bed. They should hold throughout the job even if things are vibrating and moving around. They should never restrict bed movement. Since the print job goes for perhaps ten hours, they must not fail in any way if I’m not there to watch their performance.

The other half of the battle is to create something which modifies the GCODE instructions to place a pause at the right moment (as soon as the raft has been laid down). My guess is that this will look like an OctoPrint plugin. There probably already are a number of plugins which pause at a particular z, meaning that they will pause the print job when it comes to a particular vertical layer. I was thinking that I might invent a different approach somehow in this space but I’ll see what I can come up with. I like the concept of pause after raft, though, and would imagine that this would be useful enough to others.

This should save a lot of print jobs from curl, I hope. And that should translate into a lot of money saved in filament, as well as time.

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3d cover for the pi noir camera

Using the (included) industrial-grade Autodesk Fusion 360 software, I was able to design a part for my Robo C2 printer. It’s a cover and mount for the Raspberry Pi NoIR v2 camera (8MP resolution @ $27). I picked up several cheap suction cups (@ $0.99) from Ace Hardware yesterday and used a digital caliper to carefully measure the distances all around. I’ll sand it a little to make it smooth; the photos below is what it looks like after removing the raft and supports (throw-away extras to make everything print correctly). The jaggies inside the suction cup slot I’ll leave since they’ll grip tightly. I’ll likely also keep some of the jaggies in the fitting between lid and base for the same reason.

I’ll still need to receive the longer cable from Adafruit for this to work so I haven’t snapped down the parts firmly yet. In the meantime, I might create a ribbon clip with a second suction cup (editing the money clip from an earlier post).

If you’d like the STL files for the part now, let me know and I can shoot you the URL for those but I’ll eventually write up a step-by-step tutorial on the full upgrade to adding the video feed capability.

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100posts

a robot which builds robots

I suppose the problem with buying a 3D plastic printer is that it makes the owner imagine all sorts of modifications to that very same printer, especially so when it’s largely open-sourced in the first place.

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I must admit that owning this Robo C2 printer has been a blast. I’m now past the let’s print some demos phase to the let’s print our own designs next step. And part of that design process is envisioning a better printer from this one. And what better way to modify it than printing some 3D parts, right?

So, here’s a list of some of the current things I’m doing with it.

Sound Events

It’s a wonderful printer and often, just because of the sounds you get from its collection of servo/stepper motors, it vaguely sounds a bit like R2D2, the cute robot of Star Wars fame. I’m working up a modification to add sound events from a variety of Star Wars WAV files related to R2D2.

As themes go, the movie Iron Man includes an AI character named J.A.R.V.I.S. (as voiced by Paul Bethany) who had some fun dialog with the Tony Stark character (as played by Robert Downing, Jr.) I’ve often thought that it would be sweet to add a sound event theme set based around Paul Bethany’s voicing of J.A.R.V.I.S. as well.

Video Feed and Time-Lapse Photography

I’ve just picked up a Pi NiOR camera which I’ll be adding to the printer. Next, I’ll need a longer ribbon cable, some suction cups and a designed/printed part to hold the camera itself inside the chassis.

Given the resolution of the camera, I’ll likely need to upgrade the microSD card inside to accommodate the files from the streaming activities.

Enhanced Spool Feeder

The out-of-box spool feeder seems a bit minimalistic to me. I’d like to upgrade that with a feeder which allows the spool to spin more freely. I imagine that the part needs to be more rounded at the top.

Heated Bed

The Robo C2 doesn’t include a heated bed in its design like some of its more-expensive Robo alternatives. So I’d like to machine an aluminum bed with a heating element and add this to the system.

Side-to-side Conveyor Bed

The maximum build size for the Robo C2 is a mere 5″x5″ square at the base so that’s a bit restrictive. There are techniques for joining a series of smaller parts (say, to make a sword) but I’m guessing that a possible approach is to remove the two blue side windows and rig up a conveyor system which is accurately positioned left/right as required. In this way, a very long part could be printed.

Remote Control via Joystick

I’ve purchased a Raspberry Pi Sense Hat which includes a small joystick control. I think I’d like to write something so that, using remote GPIO, I could then control the stepper motors of the printer indirectly via wi-fi.

OctoPrint Plugins

The underlying web server which runs on the printer is called OctoPrint and since it’s open-source, there are a variety of plugins for this already. I think I’d be interested in writing some plugins, especially so that someone may pause jobs in the middle so that internal components may then be assembled inside.

I’ll likely add some SMS notifications so that I can remotely know how a print job is going.

Voice Control

I also like the idea of adding voice control to the printer. How awesome would it be to just tell the printer to do something?

So basically, since the Amazon Alexa code is completely available and can be setup on a Raspberry Pi 3 computer, I can imagine then interacting with this piece (as installed on a Raspberry Pi) and having it direct activities on the printer itself.

the robo 3d c2 printer

For months now, I’ve been wanting a 3D printer to create plastic parts and I’m guessing that I just made the best choice by buying the Robo C2.

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First Impressions

First of all, it’s an attractive printer in the same way that EVE (from the WALL•E cartoon) was cute.  Perhaps you can see the resemblance?

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Second—and you guys should know by now how I love them—this printer is driven by a Raspberry Pi 3 computer inside!  I hope to clone the microSD card in that computer and go to school on their efforts to hack an even better printer out of it.

Third, the product is open-sourced and crowd-funded.

Fourth, they’re a local company.  Their office is maybe a 20-minute drive from where I live in San Diego.  Given that most people would have to purchase this online and have it shipped, they wouldn’t get to see it in action like I just did.

Fifth, it includes an iOS app which allows you to control this and any other Octoprint-enabled printer.

Sixth, at 20 microns, it looks to have the best resolution of any of the printers I saw at Frye’s Electronics and most of those had a price tag above $1400 to reach the 50 micron resolution level.

Finally, it looks like it comes with a one-year license for Autodesk Fusion 360 which appears to be a very nice program for designing.

Research and Past Experience

I spent a fair amount of time before purchasing this by researching 3D printing, the types of plastics, the pitfalls to overcome, etc.

This particular printer doesn’t have a heated bed (the place where the project is made) so it may not do a great job with ABS plastic without a lot of trickery.  The standard voodoo that is necessary is to get inventive with the bed covering so that the project adheres nicely, doesn’t skip around and further, doesn’t warp due to uneven heating.

So for an unheated bed, the PLA type of plastic is the suggestion here and I’ve purchased an additional two rolls of the stuff to get things started.

Interestingly-enough, a few years ago I worked in a large plastic manufacturing plant so I have a little experience making plastic of the rotomolded variety.

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In this industrial-sized version, colorized plastic powder is measured and put into aluminum molds on a steel frame wheel.  And this wheel then is inserted into a very large 700°F oven.

But for the consumer variety, you spend most of your time in a computer-aided design program, send a job to the printer and then wait hours (usually) to see how it turned out.  This ought to be interesting.

Projects

I have a few projects in mind for this.  I snagged a Robo Drone Kit while I was at Frye’s to give me a project which should produce some reasonable results.

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I hope to design and print an enclosure for the e=mc2 project from earlier.  Although it’s difficult, I hope to make this a clear enclosure ultimately.

I’d like to work up a design for a heated bed for the Robo C2 since it sounds like this would make ABS-related print jobs more successful.  I think I’d also like to test new bed materials since the field of 3D printing is still new and inventiveness is required here.

Given that the Robo C2 has a Raspberry Pi computer inside with OctoPi software running on it, I should be able to modify the design, add things onto the printer and do notifications, for example.  I could add an internal webcam to it, for example.

And then finally, I think I’ll spend some time on post-print finishing techniques to see what I can do in this area.

Results

Here’s the first printout from the Robo C2 after some upgrades and dialing in that critical z-adjustment.  Obviously, it’s a money clip.  It’s light blue but the red background makes it look gray otherwise.  It’s very smooth for a 3D-printed project and amazingly so for the $699 price tag on the printer.  The small, flat piece is called a “raft” and is meant to make things stable during printing, btw.