mojave, the last safe osx version?

Apple recently came out with macOS Mojave as the latest in a series of operating systems. Like most of us, you might believe that all upgrades are good upgrades. The truth is another matter entirely with respect to compatibility.

You probably didn’t know this but Apple is dropping 32-bit support in the next release.

They’ve been migrating to a full 64-bit operating system for several major versions now. You probably didn’t know this but they’re dropping 32-bit support in the next release. This is big news and it isn’t being talked about. Think of it as a means of extorting lots of money from the community of Apple developers. If those developers haven’t purchased new computers and they haven’t upgraded to the very latest version of XCode and if they haven’t paid their annual developer fees year after year then they won’t be able to exist in the next major version of OSX. Their apps just won’t work unless they comply.

What does this mean?

Simply put, perhaps a quarter of the OSX apps—especially those you have paid for—will not run anymore.

Apple’s quiet announcement

Behind-the-scenes, Apple has put up a page which warns developers what’s coming. But it’s not like they’re actually warning their own users NOT to upgrade their operating system. Of course, we’ll be nagged daily to upgrade as usual. Imagine how angry you’ll be some day in the future where you endure the typical hour-long upgrade only to find out that your Adobe Photoshop doesn’t run after the upgrade. Typical of Adobe, they’ll likely end support for the version of their software that’s only 32-bit and you’re caught in the crossfire.

How to tell

Here’s how to tell if a particular app won’t work with the next major release of OSX:

Apple menu -> About This Mac -> Software -> Applications -> select application -> 64-bit: yes/no

In this example, we see one of the pieces of programming provided by Adobe indicates “No” in that field meaning it will stop working soon.

Screen Shot 2018-11-05 at 8.41.19 AM

You can adjust the sizing of the report’s columns and then to sort by that 64-bit heading to show a list of the ones which won’t work.

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You have to laugh when you seen two of Apple’s own apps in that list and they’re responsible for their updates of course.