the 21st century digital résumé

It used to be that a programmer’s résumé was a single sheet of onionskin paper (expensive, semi-transparent) with a carefully-selected collection of one’s job history and such. Parts of what you were trying to “sell” to the would-be employer were your wordprocessing and layout design skills.

Now, everyone can type, has access to printers/computers and Microsoft Word. In fact, they can even select an attractive template from the many offered so it’s not like much skill is now involved in those areas. At one time, spellchecking was an activity that involved a Webster’s dictionary. The world has changed.

Github

To be an open-source programmer, you must now have a public set of repositories on github.com or so it seems.  My collection of repositories on github.

jsfiddle

As of today, I now have my very own jsfiddle.net collection. My public dashboard on jsfiddle.

WordPress blog

More and more, programmers are encouraged to be social and outgoing enough to want to communicate to others. Obviously, you’re here already so you have my blog’s address.

Slack

And part of that “being social” requirement now seemingly includes spending a fair amount of time during your life chatting with others within the coding space. Since slack.com projects appear to be project-centric rather than coder-centric, there doesn’t appear to be a way of publicizing your identity outside of a particular team URL.

Website portfolio

And then of course, potential employers want you to highlight several existing website concepts in which you either participated or you directly own them.

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