old-fashioned milk bottles

Once upon a time, you’d get milk delivered in the morning in glass bottles. Okay, honestly, it was other people who got that but I do know this from watching old movies.

milkman

Now that I’m old enough to go shopping myself, I have a fondness for buying my milk in bottles like this. For most people, I’d guess, the thought of adding an extra $2 for the glass rubs them the wrong way. For me, I see it as an excellent way of picking up a great deal. It would cost about $10.84 for that same glass two-quart container from Amazon.

Re-use, recycle, re-invent

So what would I do with the extra bottle? Almost anything that can fit through the top is a good candidate but food is what I primarily store in mine. I have at least 30 bottles storing dry goods, two storing refrigerated drinks and perhaps eight storing filtered water.

When I make waffles, I usually mix up several batches of the batter and that will go into the pint-sized glass bottle. Turbinado sugar also goes into the pint-sized version, making it easy to spoon straight out from there.

I purchase the Mueller’s pot-sized spaghetti which fits nicely into the quart-sized bottles. Most flours as packaged by Bob’s Red Mill will exactly fill the quart-sized version. Potato flakes? Check. Granola? Check.

I have rows of beans and lentils, pastas of all shapes, flours, starches, coconut flakes and almond slices. There’s trailmix in one. I have semolina, masa, corn meal, oatmeal, Scottish oats and Creme of Wheat.

In the refrigerator today I just added two quarts of iced tea and a quart of iced coffee. Three visits to a local coffee shop would probably set me back $12 for three drinks and I’ve just stored away the same amount for a fraction of that cost.

Perhaps the best benefit of storing most of your pantry in glass is that you no longer have to deal with pests. This is the first time in my life that I have literally zero bugs trying to eat my food.

Enter the 3D printer

The tie-in, then, to the 3D printer involves me designing a replacement funnel using Autodesk Fusion 360 for the purchased funnel I’ve used up until now. Hopefully it turns out, it’s about as big as my printer could do.

The previous funnel was okay but it wasn’t a great fit for the bottle. Big items like granola would constantly get stuck in the too-small funnel neck. This one should fit perfectly.

Screen Shot 2018-07-09 at 4.03.41 PM

Food safety and plastic

Some of you may then caution about the use of printed plastic in conjunction with food. I’m sure the PLA filament (which is made of a polymer of corn starch) is actually closer to be food-safe than the funnel which I’d purchased from a car parts store earlier.

Some of the typical concerns with food versus printed plastic is that the small grooves in the plastic allow for bacteria to grow. Okay, but this is the same for most of the plastic utensils which we routinely include in our kitchen, right?

Another concern is regarding the existence of lead in some of the nozzles used. Yes, but that must be so minuscule as to be outside of the realm of concern. In response, I could site the many harsh chemicals used in the processing of naturally-green soybeans to create an unnaturally-white soy milk product, for example.

For dry goods, the PLA funnel should be a non-issue. With reasonable cleaning I think that it will do fine with liquids as well as long as I don’t use it to funnel boiling water, for example.

too much fun

My two packages arrived today at the post office so I just hauled in all the loot from this earlier post in which I’ve purchased some new toys.

Raspberry Pi Zero W

The photos from their website don’t really describe how truly small this computer is now. They’ve somehow managed to stack the RAM on top of the microprocessor to save space. As I’ve apparently ordered the wrong video adapter cable, I’ve got a trip over to Best Buy Frye’s Electronics this evening so that I can sort that one out. I need a female HDMI to DVI, in other words. Otherwise, I’m still pretty stoked. Since there’s only one micro-USB I think I’ll temporarily need a small USB hub while I’m at it.

PiZero

NeoPixel Ring

This arrived as well, all four of the segments but it was lost on me that I’ll need to solder each of them together. Fortunately, I have a soldering iron here somewhere. :looks around: I’m certain of it.

COZIR CO2 Sensor with RH/Temp

And in the other relatively BIG package is the relatively small sensor package. No wonder they charged me $21.88 to ship this to me. Seriously, it weighs about an ounce.

And it looks like I’ll need a 2×5 jumper to attach this over to the Raspi, with a solder-able header for that, too.

Update 1

Alright, I’m back from Frye’s with a handful of stuff and I’m back in business. The video adapter allows me to see what’s coming out of the Raspberry Pi Zero W and the micro-USB hub allows me to hook up a keyboard and mouse to talk to it locally. A first install with the Raspbian Jessie Lite image resulted in a terminal-only configuration (I must have been in a hurry and didn’t read the differences on their page) so a second install of Raspbian Jessie with Pixel was just what it wanted: a full desktop experience.  If I get some time this weekend I’ll try to have it talk to either the sensor or the light ring.

Update 2

I just managed to solder together the NeoPixel ring. Due to the size of the electrical pads on the ends of these, I’d suggest that this falls into the catagory of advanced soldering and not to be taken on by the average person.

NeoPixel
These are not my lovely hands.

Additionally, I’d say that this feels a bit fragile in the area of the soldering joints between each quarter-circle. I’m going to suggest that anyone who incorporates one of these into their project needs to seriously think about ways of making this more stable/reliable since the soldering joints between them are tenuously-small.  (Imagine three distinct electrical connections across the tiny width of this thing.)

What I also found is that there isn’t anywhere to clamp a hemostat for soldering these jumpers since the LEDs run all the way to the end where the connections should go.

I did add an inline resistor as Adafruit suggested to lower the input voltage or perhaps to lower start-up voltage spikes.

I managed to re-purpose a nice external 5V switching power supply that should drive all the LEDs nicely. It was left over from the supercomputer project when I swapped in a USB-based charger instead for that. Amazingly, Adafruit suggests that those 60 LEDs need a whopping 3.6A of power to drive them. I’m guessing that reality is more like 1A but I’ll play this safe. Per Adafruit’s suggestion I included a 1000 µF electrolytic capacitor across the output voltage to protect the NeoPixels.

VGD-60

So I’m prepped to do a final test of the NeoPixel ring for power and functionality on a standard Raspberry Pi 3 rig (since it sports an actual header). Once I’ve coded a test and verified that it works then I’ll take the soldering iron to the Raspberry Pi Zero W and wire it in with a quick-connect.

headerwire

I’ve now got the Raspberry Pi Zero W booting with just the power adapter. Note that you can rename its hostname, toggle on the VNC Server, adjust the default screen resolution to your liking and then—in the Finder program in OS X—open up a remote session to its Desktop with vnc://pi@hostname.local, for example. Or, toggle on the SSH Server and connect from a Terminal session with ssh pi@hostname.local.

Have I mentioned how awesome it is to have a fully-functioning computer for $10 (plus $6 for the micro SD)?

And now the power supply is completed and wired to the NeoPixel ring. Everything’s set for 5V DC in at the moment but I may try to adjust the input voltage down to 3.3V later for technical reasons. (The NeoPixels are designed for the Arduino and its output data voltage is 5V whereas the Raspberry Pi is only 3.3V. By adjusting the input voltage down then it makes a 3.3V data line look bigger than it is. There are other tricks like adding a 3V-to-5V data inverter chip but I’d like to avoid that one if possible.)

PowerSupply

Update 3

I’ve smoke-tested the power supply/ring combination and it’s looking good. To make things easier for this step, I’ve now setup a surrogate Raspberry Pi 3 for testing things but since I only had a leftover 4GB microSD, I was forced to use the no-desktop “Lite” Jessie version of Raspbian. But that’s now ready and I’ll likely have some time this weekend to do a basic blink test.