edit gcode externally

I’ve been making some updates to a command line interface (CLI) program lately. I wrote it in the Go language and it’s useful for editing 3D printer gcode files.

A GCODE file is a set of toolpath instructions for both 3D printers and CNC machines.

GcodeEdit

The program is called GcodeEdit and it can so far do the following:

  1. Update the hotend’s temperature, useful for changing the filament material you’d like to use for the part
  2. Show a variety of information from the file, like number of layers and the slicer software which was used to create it, for example
  3. Remove all heat-, fan- and extrusion-related commands so that you can watch the printer go through a “dry run” without wasting any plastic
  4. Repeat the indicated layer but without extruding any plastic, suitable for “ironing” out the last layer and useful during the first couple of layers, for example

I intend to keep adding options to this program and I use it myself, for what it’s worth.

Repository

hello

Since I’m now an instructor, I thought I would create a repository which demonstrates  code for the many languages out there which could produce a command line tool/interface (CLI).

HelloCommandLine

Currently, there are nine languages represented but I may add more later. Note that everything here is decidedly OSX-specific. Each subsection includes the instructions for running and/or compiling each, noting that some are compiled languages and some are not.

get to dah choppa

Today’s post title comes from the Schwarzenegger movie Predator but the dialog has taken on a life of its own in the world of memes.

Get-to-the-choppa

GetToDahChoppa CLI tool

I’ve just completed another program written in the Go language compiler which will take an existing GCODE file for 3D printing and chop it into as many layers as you’d like.

Repository

Color by layer

You might be wondering why you’d like to do such a thing. One of the best reasons I could think of would be to print different colors on the same part. In this part example displayed, black filament is used from layers one through seventeen and white is used from layers eighteen and up. The result looks quite professional even if this is using the lowest quality setting on my printer and it took less than twenty minutes to finish.

DSC_0199

Saving an aborted print

Sometimes things go wrong. In the example below, my (costly) carbon fiber—infused filament spool ran out during the print job, noting that the printer arrived with a faulty run-out switch. For most people, they would just start over on such a part, wasting the plastic and the hours spent and begin again.

IMG_0213

Fortunately, you can now chop your original GCODE file to just print the missing top to save the day (and the part, of course).

IMG_0195

go figure

For years, if I needed to write a computer program, I’d have used one of the following: C, C++ or C#. Those have been the mainstays of programmers who needed an executable program for at least the two decades. Today, though, I’ve just written my first executable in a new language that’s surprisingly easy to work with.

Go

The Go language is like the new kid on the block of compilers. Like the ones mentioned before, it will take text and convert it into instructions the computer can do.

Probably the best thing about the Go language is that it’s entirely open-sourced. If you wanted to work on the compiler itself, you could do so.

SlicingInfo

The program I’ve just written is technically called a Command Line Interface (CLI) program and will display technical details inside the selected GCODE file for a 3D print job.

Repository

Typical session of the program in use:

$ SlicingInfo RC_3DBenchy.gcode
Slicer:          Cura_SteamEngine 2.3.1
Layers:          239
Quality:         low
Profile:         Low Quality Robo C2
Filament size:   1.75
Hotend temp:     190
Bed temp:        0
Supports:        False
Retraction:      True
Jerk:            True
Speed 1st layer: 10
Print speed:     50
Travel speed:    80
Infill pattern:  cubic
Finished.