rip, red hat

Say it isn’t so.

Since the end of October is all about scary stories… Just on the heals of Microsoft buying github for US$7.5B last year, IBM has now has purchased Red Hat Linux for a cool US$34B dollars.

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Granted, I haven’t used Red Hat in a few years mostly since it is one of the few paid UNIX-based operating systems out there. Ubuntu, backed by Canonical, is clearly the better choice for anyone who knows what’s going on.

IBM is the antithesis of open-source software, as is Microsoft. This is just sad. But good riddance. Now get in the hole, Red Hat.

this-is-capitalism

microsoft wants open source extinguished

On June 9th when Microsoft had just purchased github.com, I wrote about how I thought this was something tragic for the world of open source. This morning I awoke to several new security notifications from my repositories there (requiring about an hour of my time to adjust my code):

“We found a potential security vulnerability in a repository for which you have been granted security alert access. Known low severity security vulnerability detected in debug < 2.6.9 defined in package.json.”

On the surface, one might think that Microsoft is trying to make the world a better place. You might think this if you’re an optimist or a friend of them, perhaps. Maybe Microsoft cares about security so much that—having just purchased github—they now want to ratchet up the quality of the collection of software as stored there by most people who don’t like them…?

But if you’re a pessimist or if you’re someone who doesn’t like Microsoft, could there be another reason behind this new diligence they’re trying to bring to code security? It’s not like Microsoft has a great track record in writing bug-free or network-safe code themselves.

“It’s not like Microsoft has a great track record in writing bug-free or network-safe code themselves.”

Strategic sabotage

Richard Nixon was known to do something termed ratfucking in the political world. Wiki even has a page on the subject. It means “political sabotage or dirty tricks”. It would eventually result in his impeachment. In some college circles, a mean-spirited prank is part of the playing field. To me, it feels like many of the players inside Microsoft are the same type of people, those who have no qualms destroying the competition, tripping them up and generally exercising a “whatever it takes” attitude toward their so-called success.

Microsoft’s internal methods:

Steal their air

In a lawsuit, the U.S. Department of Justice turned up an internal tactic used inside Microsoft which describes what they do when they feel that a competitor needs to be removed: “embrace, extend and extinguish”. In other words, 1) embrace open source by buying the main storehouse for its code, 2) create products such as Visual Studio Code which replaces similar free editors and 3) gradually remove the competition by getting rid of it now that you’re in a controlling position.

Appeal to fear

Another tactic they use in the market space is to promote fear with respect to anything the competition could provide. We’re seeing this now in the pseudo-warnings being auto-generated by github.

What this is

What we’re seeing is a direct and strategic beginning to Microsoft’s move to embrace, extend and extinguish github and yet it’s open source itself who is their ultimate target.

The future of gihub and open source

Expect more of the same: dirty politics related to the leading repository site of what Microsoft views as their competition.

on the mad exodus from github.com

If you don’t code for a living, you probably didn’t hear about the US7.5B deal in which Microsoft is now purchasing github.com. For the rest of us, this is big news.

GitHub Inc. is a web-based hosting service for version control of software using git. They offer both private repositories and free accounts (which are commonly used to host open-source software projects). With its 28 million public repositories, it’s the largest host of source code in the world.

Github’s competitors are reporting record numbers of customers moving their repositories away from the now Microsoft-owned provider.

What Microsoft now controls

Presumably, Microsoft now controls both Atom and Electron, two extremely powerful platforms in the coding space. The former is a great code editor and the latter is the underlying executable program which allows others to code in JavaScript to create a very usable desktop/GUI application.

Microsoft also now control the revenue stream. Each private repository costs $7/month or $9/month, depending upon whether its personal- or business-related.

Microsoft now apparently has access to the code in those private repositories. Just imagine what their competitors must be thinking, now that Microsoft has a copy of their internal project code to include any secret ideas those competitors have been working on.

Alternatives

We’ve all been lulled by github’s ease-of-use, it’s free nature and such. We haven’t even considered alternatives before now, to be honest. The specter of this new playing field means that we must look at our options.

Gogs.io is an open-source option for hosting your own github-like service.

Gogs

Over the last three days, I’ve now setup my own private, internal Gogs service called gitjs.io. Since I own the domain name I may later push this into the cloud but for now, it’s running on one of my computers here at home.

After the initial hurdles to get OSX to startup the Gogs service on a privileged port (http/80) and to automatically start upon bootup, I must say that I love it.

It’s a full-featured github-like experience throughout with all the screens you’d expect. You can create users, organizational levels and do the things you did over on github.

The command line git program interacts with the service as expected. The underlying code creates a global repository folder to stores everything much the same way that github might.

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The Future of Source Control

I don’t need a crystal ball to suggest that Microsoft’s purchase is going to be a game-changer for open source. The world of open source is the very antonym of what Microsoft stands for.

I would suggest that anyone and everyone with a github account highly consider the immediate need to move your code elsewhere. Microsoft has a long history of buying up competitive technologies only to starve them of air over time. In fact, internally Microsoft used the term “starve them of air” to describe how they would ruin a competitor’s advantage in the market.

It’s time to take your code and run.

the matrix linode’d

Today’s review is about a pretty decent hosting company called Linode. Here’s the three-day timeline from idea to implementation:

  1. Thursday: decided to create a new info website about 3D printing, bought the domain name on GoDaddy and waited for the changes to take effect at midnight
  2. Thursday: created a Github repository to store the source for the website since I’m open-source like that
  3. Thursday: created an account on Linode, purchasing a “linode” for that
  4. Thursday: designed/created the initial local/development website layout/framework, collected images and content
  5. Friday: created (provisioned) the basic linode (virtual machine) for the website on production, provisioned a virtual drive, deployed Ubuntu 16.04LTS onto that, booted and remoted into that, ran updates, installed the framework, added the website, setup security and the firewall
  6. Friday: adjusted the DNS at GoDaddy to point to the new server, added more content
  7. Saturday: launched the website on Linode with the initial version
  8. Saturday: tweaked the settings to make the Node.js—based website start on bootup
  9. Saturday: added more content to the website

site

Not bad for an open-sourced 10-page (44 files) responsive website, if I do say so myself.

Please note that when I say “hosting company”, I really mean a “virtual server provider” so this is more like Amazon EC2 as a service offering. I didn’t just rent website space (like on Wix.com or WordPress.com), I rented an entire virtual server, if you will.

Comparison of virtual server versus website space

There are some advantages/disadvantages of renting a virtual server over just some website slot on a server somewhere:

Pros:

  • In theory, you could run several websites from a virtual server
  • You can run services in the background (like Node.js) and manage them
  • You can run multiple threads on the same server, like helper routines which do something other than serving up pages
  • You’re not limited to the set of templates that are available from Wix.com, for example
  • Your website runs separately from other websites
  • You get an IP address which is only used for your website

Cons:

  • You have to setup security yourself since you’re responsible for the entire server
  • The learning curve is steeper
  • You have to know I.T. things like setting up servers and installing software

Framework/software

Here’s a list of what I used for this website:

  • Node.js: Probably the most famous event-driven JavaScript runtime engine out there
  • Express: A minimalistic Node.js framework for separating code from content on a website
  • Bootstrap.css: A responsive stylesheet and component library for styling a website
  • PM2: A handy process manager for Node-based applications on a server.  After pulling new code, I might run the command pm2 restart AppName to restart the service

Documentation

Kudos to Linode for providing a detailed Getting Started guide along with several tutorial videos on the subject.

And further, a note of thanks to PM2 which seems to satisfy the requirements of bringing up and managing a Node.js application as a service within a production environment and their ample documentation.

Suitability

Is Linode well-suited for most website designers/developers? Probably not. On an I.T. complexity scale from 1 to 10 potatoes, I’d say they’re probably seven potatoes, perhaps. In this case, you’d have to be comfortable doing the following:

  • Using a web-based console to allocate and bring up/down a virtual server
  • Using ssh to remote into your virtual server
  • Navigating within a command line interface on a Linux computer or similar
  • Using ssh-keygen to generate a keypair
  • Using apt-get to update things
  • Editing files using nano
  • Managing services, reading log files
  • Remotely rebooting your virtual server
  • Setting up a firewall, testing and managing same
  • Applying code using git
  • Testing a website to verify that there are no 404 (file not found) type of errors, for example
  • And obviously, creating/designing a website in the first place and using a repository like Github for storing those files

That said, it was a perfect fit for me since I can do those things. In fact, the Linode-related part of this took no more than two hours since this is the first time I’ve used their interface. My next one should go much faster.

Observations

I will say that I’m impressed. Unlike Amazon AWS, Microsoft and Google, the people at Linode haven’t created an interface that’s overly complicated. It seems to work simply and to do the things you need to do and those are: 1) buy a virtual server, 2) deploy something onto it, 3) turn it on and 4) remote into it. I don’t think the “big three” have figured this out yet; their interfaces and the assumed workflow requires too much research, in my humble opinion.

Additionally, the PM2 software does a great job of working with the git-based code distribution model, allowing you to restart the Node.js app when it’s required and to start up automatically each reboot. There’s an easy-to-remember command interface like pm2 show AppName which tells you what you usually want to know.

At a cost of $5/month, it compares favorably to most of the well-known hosting providers out there. The basic linode will likely satisfy the requirements of the average Node.js application up to a reasonable level of simultaneous users, I’d suggest.

price

keeping your pi cool

An average computer’s operating system maintains some logistics about the cpu, like its input voltage, temperature and the like. The Raspberry Pi single board computer is no exception and will even scale back its speed if it determines that its internal temperature is getting too high. That’s a good thing but another approach is to proactively cool the cpu with a fan when it’s approaching that threshhold.

pi-temp.png

Since I’m creating a cube-like chassis to hold four of these Raspberry Pi 3 computers, I’ll soon need this functionality. So I’ve just created a new repository with JavaScript code to return the cpu’s temperature in fahrenheit/celsius as a string or a number. One could then programmatically turn on/off a fan using the GPIO pins using this information.

Here’s that repository:  raspi-temp

traveling at the speed of open-source

pull request:  An external-repository modification to someone else’s code which you’d like them to adopt into the master copy of the original repository, specifically the notification request to ask for this.

It’s funny, I put in a pull request in March of this year for a timezone calculation bug which I’d discovered somewhere out there in someone else’s code.  I guess I was trying to be a good net citizen and giving back to the community.  I’d forgotten completely about it until now.  The original author merged my commit into his code yesterday and blessed it, basically.  This would actually be my very first pull request in the world of open source so I suppose that’s special in some way.

In this particular case, it took the author almost three months to see the request and get around to responding to it.  Granted, few of us would be paid to maintain our open-source repositories so they’re usually just considered hobbies for most of us, something we do in our spare time.

As a coder with many decades of experience, this pacing is a bit odd to me.  (As in, “wow, three months to bless a quick-and-dirty code fix”.)

I’m not complaining…  Okay, maybe I’m complaining.  Maybe I was just a bit naive to the average amount of effort people are putting into this.

The entire collective force of open-source is something to behold.  Almost every day some huge effort is being launched and thousands—even millions—of downloads occur from these repositories.  But what happens to the original codebase when the author gets side-tracked with their next great idea?

But what happens to the original codebase when the author gets side-tracked with their next great idea?

The New, New Thing

All this reminds me of the biographical book “The New, New Thing” about a serial-entrepreneur, Jim Clark (of Netscape fame).  The biography doesn’t really paint a pretty picture of the billionaire, instead suggesting that he was perhaps suffering from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD) or possibly Hypomania.  He couldn’t focus on a project after the second year, opting to push the work onto others and move to the next project.

I guess I have to ask what part this plays in the world of open-source software.  As an inventive person, I stare at my To-Do list of project ideas and realize that it could be argued that this is some mark of my own internal restlessness.  Could I be content working on one project for year after year?

I’m a former CEO and at one time I did run a software development firm for nine years.  Fortunately, though, I had project after project then to develop so that kept things lively. I’m impressed by those who literally spent most of their lifetime devoted to a single project.

A Lifetime of Service

Dr. Royal Rife comes to mind as one of these people.  He was curing cancer and a variety of diseases back in the 1930 decade but he spent much of his life before this inventing the microscopes and medical device equipment which he would use in the culmination of his life’s achievement.  His original home site is now the location of one of the Scripps hospitals here in San Diego but seemingly nobody knows his story.  He spent a lifetime curing cancer and he isn’t famous for it.

I guess we as a society aren’t really conditioned to reward and remember someone who did one thing very well.  To be famous or respected now, presumably you have to produce project after project, never satisfied with the maintenance of same, always chasing the next big thing.

If You Build It, Own It

I guess my word of caution in the world of open-source then is to own what you’ve built.  Try to revisit it from time to time, like you might keep a plant alive by watering it once in a while.  Do new things, of course.  But don’t forget that your last thing could actually be ticket to your success.

the rise and fall of the microsoft empire

1975-1980

Our historical timeline begins in 1975 when an unlikely duo—Paul Allen as Batman and Bill Gates as his awkward “Boy Wonder”—started Microsoft Corporation.  I’m guessing that ro-sham-bo was involved in this decision but incredibly somehow Bill was made the CEO when the company got its start.  Maybe dropping out of Harvard gives you that kind of confidence.

1981BillPaul

1981-2000

Nothing really significant happened until they managed to modify an existing operating system for the IBM PC in 1981 from another company and rename this to MS-DOS. Significant sales of the IBM series of computers and those of their competitors then launched a thirty-year stretch of dominance in the business world in the area of operating systems, software and development platforms.

For most of us, we reasonably dismissed Apple’s hardware and the MacIntosh operating systems as nothing we could seriously use in business outside of the marketing department.

Consumers bought new versions of software and that license was good for life.  It could often be transferred from one computer to the next as long as the last one was de-registered first.  If you built software for Windows, you likely used a Microsoft compiler to do so and you paid for that.  In fact, the Microsoft Technet collection of CDs was quite expensive.

2001

About six years into the “Internet Tidal Wave” as Bill would call it, Microsoft was starting to lose its way.  They tried to dominate in the browser wars but never quite managed to quash the competition.  Others saw their efforts in this area as annoying.  Their software for creating programs, Visual Studio, first hit the scene about four years prior to this.

Google was founded some five years prior and was just beginning to get attention from an investor before they had anything real yet.  In 1999 they moved from their garage to an actual building in Palo Alto.  Yahoo’s popularity as a search engine from a decade ago was waning.  Google’s ad-based revenue from keywords was paying off; they’d planted a money tree which eventually created an entire forest of money trees for them.  It wouldn’t be long until Microsoft’s executives behind closed doors would consider Google their biggest threat.

About this time Apple created a very clever method of provisioning content for one-and-only-one device within the music-delivery space.  The iTunes store would turn out to be the goose that laid the golden egg, as seen in the following revenues.  And yet, it would take years for either Microsoft or Google to realize the beauty in this fulfillment model and to come up with their own versions.

showmethemoney

The “Internet of Things” concept started gaining in popularity at this time.

2009

Microsoft’s attempts at copying Google’s success (MSN Search, Windows Live Search, Live Search) now culminated in the introduction of Bing as their default search engine destination for all things Microsoft.

Apple introduced the first iPhone and the first iPad about this time, noting that the same provisioning model from iTunes was incorporated into both via iOS.  The subscription model of sofware licensing was born with this, if you think about it.  If you wanted to write a program for either, you needed to use Apple’s software to do so.

Google has just introduced Chrome as a browser and would begin their campaign to slowly break Internet Explorer.  The same was true of the Android phone and its related operating system.  It would take a few years for Microsoft to catch up to either the iPhone or the Android before releasing their own app-savvy smartphone offering.

Amazon some three years prior had introduced the beginning of what would be a full complement of cloud-based services to support web development.  It would take Microsoft two full years to realize that they needed to be in this space and they didn’t have their offering ready for a few years more, too late to effectively compete.

Github.com had just celebrated their first year online, hosting over 46,000 repositories by then.  The world of open source was the very antonym to the way that software had been developed prior to this.

The free Ubuntu operating system was released about four years prior to this, backed by the well-funded company Canonical.

2015

Microsoft releases Windows 10, “the last version of Windows” (they claimed).  Rumors suggested that Windows would eventually go from a version-based license model to an annual-subscription model with respect to pricing.  I think it’s safe to say that the market hasn’t really embraced either Windows 8 or Windows 10.

The subscription-based model for Office 365 was introduced four years prior to this so the writing was definitely on the wall:  Microsoft wanted to depart from their former methods of making money and to chase the monthly subscription model.

2015-popular-coding-languages

The world of open source was offering new programmers a wealth of free code.  All they had to do was to take it and make it their own.  Formerly, Microsoft-friendly coding languages like C, C++, C#, VB and .NET dominated the playing field but this graphic shows how the game had changed.

2017

And here we are, present-day.  That curious number 42 now describes the number of years that Microsoft has been around.

Yesterday evening, I attended a very geeky meetup of perhaps fifty or sixty coders and only saw one Windows-based laptop.  Almost everyone had a MacBook of some kind.

I just spent about two hours today installing the free Visual Studio Community 2017 software so that I could—in theory, anyway—alter a free copy of the source code for TightVNC software.  Out of the box, so-to-speak, Visual Studio doesn’t want me to build this project since it uses an earlier target platform (Windows 7 or 8, one would assume).

Microsoft only wants me to make things for Windows 10.

So rather than making it easy for me to build a program that will happily work with Windows 7, they’re forcing me to jump through hoops in order to add the necessary pieces for this to happen.

Add two more hours to this and I find that my installation does not want to download the earlier pieces to allow this to happen.  I’m forced to then upgrade the code to Windows 10 compatibility mode… only to find that the build fails with 528 errors.

The main crux of all these errors appear to be:  “we can’t find common files”.  It’s a very amateur sort of error from a company that’s been providing compilers for several decades now.

I have to think that Microsoft doesn’t want me to do anything with Visual Studio unless it benefits Microsoft.  And this is the core of the reason why I suggest that they’re doomed.

Every time a coder like myself runs into obstacles like these, the usual seed that’s planted inside their head is “this would be easier with another free compiler or another language from someone else”.

2022

Fast-forward another five years and Microsoft will have lost ground on many fronts.  New software development here, there and everywhere will be via some language which wasn’t popularized by Microsoft on computers which aren’t Windows and with browsers which aren’t Internet Explorer or Edge.  Our toasters and refrigerators and our cars will be powered by the Ubuntu operating system or perhaps Debian, a similar free Linux flavor.  These appliances will be connected to our wi-fi and even to the Internet but there won’t be a scrap of anything Microsoft about them.  They’ll be coded up with something that isn’t C#, doesn’t use .NET and doesn’t need Visual Studio in order to compile it.

The only thing with a Microsoft pedigree with some staying power could be some of the websites and services currently served up at Microsoft’s datacenters via Azure.  But Amazon or Google could kill that by simply lowering their own prices for cloud-based services.

the 21st century digital résumé

It used to be that a programmer’s résumé was a single sheet of onionskin paper (expensive, semi-transparent) with a carefully-selected collection of one’s job history and such. Parts of what you were trying to “sell” to the would-be employer were your wordprocessing and layout design skills.

Now, everyone can type, has access to printers/computers and Microsoft Word. In fact, they can even select an attractive template from the many offered so it’s not like much skill is now involved in those areas. At one time, spellchecking was an activity that involved a Webster’s dictionary. The world has changed.

Github

To be an open-source programmer, you must now have a public set of repositories on github.com or so it seems.  My collection of repositories on github.

jsfiddle

As of today, I now have my very own jsfiddle.net collection. My public dashboard on jsfiddle.

WordPress blog

More and more, programmers are encouraged to be social and outgoing enough to want to communicate to others. Obviously, you’re here already so you have my blog’s address.

Slack

And part of that “being social” requirement now seemingly includes spending a fair amount of time during your life chatting with others within the coding space. Since slack.com projects appear to be project-centric rather than coder-centric, there doesn’t appear to be a way of publicizing your identity outside of a particular team URL.

Website portfolio

And then of course, potential employers want you to highlight several existing website concepts in which you either participated or you directly own them.

why do you contribute to other’s repositories?

I’m interested to hear from other open-source coders out there. I’d like to know some of your motivations for contributing to another person’s or another team’s open-source repository. Call it a social studies experiment, if you will.

1st-Person Open-source

Here, I’m attempting to answer the question for everyone: “Why do you work on your own project in a public way and sharing your source code, knowing full-well that someone may take your code or fork your project and become rich and famous as a result?”

  1. I believe that my project has some worth for others and sharing it could make the world a better place to live in
  2. Other people might help me with my project
  3. A well-rounded github set of repositories looks good on my résumé
  4. I’m not expecting to make money from doing this
  5. Since I don’t live in America, there aren’t as many opportunities so this is my way of getting some attention from potential companies there

Let me know if I’ve missed any motivations here.

2nd/3rd-Person Open-source

This one’s a little trickier for me since I’ve been a life-time coder. In the not-so-distant past I was well-paid for working on software projects and have watched the coding salaries and the availability of programming gigs all erode.

The next question then for everyone: “Why do you work on someone else’s project in a public way, fixing their bugs and adding features, knowing full-well that some else may become rich and famous as a result?”

Case study – Github: Bloomberg reports that they recently brought in another $100M in venture capital based upon the Enterprise-level private repository revenue they’re currently earning. They’re currently valued at US$2B.

  1. I really like the other project’s code (let’s say, the Atom editor), believe in it and want it to be more awesome than it already is; since I use it myself, I’m getting something from the collaboration
  2. I want to work on a big project but I can’t otherwise get a job in a software development company so this is the next best thing; I’m getting the experience working in a software development team
  3. “Many hands make light work”; it feels good to help others; karma; “what comes around, goes around”…
  4. As a new programmer, I don’t have enough experience to start my own project yet
  5. Since I don’t live in America, there aren’t as many opportunities so this is my way of getting some attention from potential companies there; I might get hired by doing this

If I’ve missed any of your own motivations for coding on other people’s/team’s open-source projects, please add a comment here.

Some Thoughts on the Open-source Subject

What’s strange is when you have an entire team of people spread all over the planet, they’re working together on a project started by one guy (let’s say), time goes by, the project goes viral and then suddenly one day that “one guy” gets $250M in venture capital (like in the case of github). It’s valued at US$2B at the moment, btw. That’s about the same value as the New York Times.

I wonder if the investment companies realize that for the average open-source “company” this means that 1) they’re not necessarily incorporated, 2) they probably don’t have an office nor even a business checking account, 3) and anyone can fork the collection of code and start their own Atom-knockoff project if they wanted to.

And what happens to all the people whose free labor went into making github who they are today? Do they get a share of the money? No, they don’t. Do they get a job? Possibly, I suppose it all depends upon that original guy. But at this point, the power has greatly shifted from what it was before (more of a democratic society) to what it is now (more of a capitalistic corporation).

The siren call of open-source is a world which is free from capitalism. But what seems to happen is that these big projects are becoming exactly that, the thing these coders hated in the first place (or so it would seem). Open-source is supposed to be a culture. So why is it turning into nothing more than a first step to becoming a (funded) software development corporation in the end?

unseen complications

Don’t you hate the unseen complications that rear their ugly heads somewhere down the line?  Today’s drama involved the inclusion of a very cool fullscreen api by Vincent Guillou.  Of course, it worked great in development and then failed silently on production.  Here is an overview of what makes my production site a little different.

Production Site Overview

GoDaddy domain name hosting with option “forwarding with masking” —> Firebase.com—based hosting site

GoDaddy does this technically by serving up a single HTML page which simply frames the remote content.  By its nature, it uses the HTTP protocol and cannot use HTTPS. In its configuration it allows you to set either HTTP/HTTPS for the framed content, however.  You’d think that you would have plenty of room to make something work. And it did work just fine up until the latest add to the project:  a button which allows the browser to go full screen and back again.

Unfortunately, the first push to production then failed silently. The button was there but didn’t seem to work. Entering the development area of the browser I saw that the browser had to block the content because the framing page was HTTP and the framed content was HTTPS and this isn’t allowed.

Okay, so I thought I could then adjust GoDaddy’s settings so that I could frame the content as HTTP to match the parent document. Unfortunately I see that Firebase always uses HTTPS and does not support HTTP. Since I can’t mis-match the content and combined with the fact that I can’t easily promote GoDaddy to HTTPS on the framing page or demote Firebase on the framed page, I was screwed.

To make a long story short, I either had to pay for hosting at Firebase (which allows you to bind your domain name to their hosting server) or I could abandon the cool  feature. Since I’m trying to highlight the cool new features of the latest browsers I decided that’s it’s better to just pay Firebase in this case.

It was still a bit technical in getting all this to work since Firebase only bound a single entity (www) to the website using my domain. This means that if someone just puts in my domain name only then they’re stuck at a GoDaddy-parked page. To work around this problem, I set up a redirect to deal with this situation. This time it looked like:  myJS.io -> http://www.myJS.io. Problem solved.

So now, the cool new feature is working on production and the implementation is slightly simpler, not that anyone else would necessarily know.