autodesk fusion 360

The new Robo C2 comes with a one-year trial of CAD software which appears to be none other than the probably-expensive Autodesk Fusion 360.  It looks like it allows you to design a part, engineer & simulate forces as well as to create tool paths (slice) a part for 3D printing, for example.  I’ve been attempting to use the open-sourced FreeCAD but the learning curve has been slow for me and I’ve run into some Mac-related bugs when attempting to create a screw thread, unfortunately.  So I hope to give this trial software some of my attention to see if I can design some parts.

AutodeskFusion360

First Thoughts

Wow.  It’s just a beautiful interface.  It starts things up with a clean working space set in a useful 3D perspective.

Because of the barren space they’re trying to create, Autodesk has pushed the typical  File -> Open commands off into a hidden panel.  It’s that tic-tac-toe menu icon in the upper left.  Opening this, I’m guessing that there is some kind of change control software running since they have indicators for “master” (branch), View Project History, Branch / Merge Options, Upload files from your desktop.  So perhaps they store all your files in a cloud-based repository, if I’m guessing correctly.  Additionally, there is built-in support for team members.

From what I’m seeing, there are no example files typical of a design program.  Still within the Data Panel, pressing what I thought was a “back” triangle, I’m now seeing a different collection of options:  My Recent Data, Demo Project, My First Project and then under Samples, Basic Training, CAM Samples, Design Samples, Simulation Samples and finally, Workshops & Events.  So I was wrong in suggesting that there are no samples, they’re just an Easter Egg within the interface.  Double-clicking Design Samples includes three very-sexy designs:  bike frame, lamp and utility knife.  I’m bringing in the lamp.

Viewing a Part

It takes a bit to learn Autodesk’s methods of changing viewpoint but I think I’ve got it.  By interacting with that cube in the upper-right corner, this is how you can quickly move around your part.  Note that clicking the little home symbol returns to the original perspective.  Click a labelled face of the cube, go to that perspective.  Grab and move the corner of the cube and you have the usual behavior in most 3D programs when you grab-and-move the part itself.  It feels like they only want you to click on the part when doing a selection process, so that’s probably a good idea to separate the two activities.

LampPerspective

Selecting Something (a Sketch) to Modify

Looks like their basic building block is a Sketch (a 2D drawing) so when I click on the top of the lamp’s base, this sketch is selected.  Now that it’s highlighted, I’m clicking the Modify icon in the Toolbar.

Modify

Attempting to do a Physical Material replace didn’t seem to work for me.  The method appears to be to click on the top of the base, then shift-click each of the other two parts, then right-click to bring up a contextual menu, choosing Appearance from there.  I then changed the material to a gray aluminum.

Aluminum

A mere ten minutes into it and without reverting to Google searches for answers, I’ve managed to do something in here.  That’s seriously better than my results from FreeCAD.

Price

Okay, so I just had to know how much this would cost me after the trial period.  It’s $40/month as a month-to-month subscription or $25/month if paid up-front annually ($300/year).  That’s probably worth it if you do this for a living.  Is it worth it for a standard hobbyist/maker?  That’s a tough call.  You usually end up spending your money on the hardware and consumables, to be honest.

I think Autodesk needs a notch in their software for the new world of amateurs who need to design parts.  Certainly, their three-year trial for students is awesome but that doesn’t help the rest of us who aren’t commercial.

Overall Thoughts

I guess I’ll need to go into crunch mode this year and to produce most of the 3D designs that I had in mind.  But I will circle back after one project and see if it exports nicely for other (free) softwares out there.  Otherwise, you’d be stuck in Autodesk’s business model and that sounds a bit expensive in the long haul.

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