ubuntu bash now in windows 10…?

There’s a little-known feature now in Windows 10 which is a fairly awesome piece if you know Linux/Ubuntu and, say, you’re a coder. Microsoft and Canonical got together to add an Ubuntu on Windows subsystem in the 14393.0 “Anniversary Update” OS Build.

The feature is also called the Windows Subsystem for Linux. What’s interesting is that from bash you can actually invoke a Windows executable or one compiled for Ubuntu. It can run DOS batch files as well as shell scripts.

  1. Turn on Developer Mode in Windows 10 -> Settings -> Update & Security -> For developers
  2. Turn on the Windows Subsystem for Linux (Beta) in Windows 10 -> search for “Turn Windows features” -> select Turn Windows features on or off
  3. Restart Windows 10
  4. Go to a command prompt
  5. Enter bash and type a y to continue, noting that this step will take about 20 minutes
  6. When finally prompted, enter a UNIX username (it’s case-sensitive) and a password (again, case-sensitive) which are completely separate from your other credentials

From this point you can run an Ubuntu bash prompt either from the added Start entry or by entering bash in an MS-DOS or PowerShell prompt.

Notes

  • It’s probably not a good idea to use Notepad or similar Windows tools to edit configuration files within the Ubuntu space.
  • You should be able to sudo from this first user as you might expect.
  • Once logged in, you’ll land in a /mnt/c/Users/username location from a Unix perspective.
  • Since the OS is Ubuntu, you would run sudo apt-get update to install things.
  • If you want to invoke Windows executables from a bash session, you probably want to start by adding the SYSTEM32 folder to your path, for example: export PATH=$PATH:/mnt/c/Windows/System32 but since this is UNIX you’ll need to make sure that the capitalization is right for each path.
  • Run lsb_release -a if you’d like to see which release of Ubuntu is running.
  • In theory, you could run bash scripts within a PowerShell script.
  • At this time, it does not support GUI applications.

windows 10 “free upgrade” is over

Bummer. We had a year to upgrade from Windows 7/8 to the latest Windows 10 for free and we missed it. It’s not because we’re lazy. Sometimes it’s just because I.T. is under-funded and it literally takes all of our time to do other things. A fraction of those workstations only had 2GB of RAM, for example, and couldn’t be updated. And sometimes you have a collection of Windows XP computers that didn’t quality for the update.

So here you are, August 2016 and you have several aging computers that may or may not be worth the $$ to pay for the Windows 10 license. If you’re anything like me then you review alternatives.

MaaS (metal-as-a-service)

One very cool option that you can do with a pile of old Dell Vostro 200 workstations is to convert them into a private cloud. I recently did just this. Imagine a rack of computers—all without monitors/keyboards/mice—and they all do something you rarely see: they boot over the network via Ethernet to pull down an image you’ve setup. Once you’ve set everything up it’s wonderfully automatic. The name of the collection of services is called Openstack.

What’s even better is that once each node has fully provisioned itself with an image, it goes to sleep, turning itself off. And then the cluster control can wake it up remotely over Ethernet and it goes to work again.

And the best of all is that the entire thing is free from a software standpoint. (Free is good.) Note that for the default installation you’ll need a spare Ethernet hub/switch, one of the computers needs to have two Ethernet adapters and at least five of the computers will need double hard drives. Since I had so many spare computers I just cannibalized where necessary.

If you’re interested in reviewing this as well, check out this link on Ubuntu’s website. Once you’re finished you’ll have a system in which you can spin up virtual computers and allocate them as you wish. You may securely remote into these virtual computers using the putty software client. If you’ve configured it to use public IP addresses you can even publish websites, for example.

The version that I reviewed was a few back from the current release and hopefully everything is much more stable now. I noted then that it wasn’t quite ready for “prime time” but I’d guess that it’s ready to go by now.

Ubuntu Server or Desktop

Even if you don’t go all the way and create a private cloud you can always just install the free Ubuntu operating system as a server or a desktop computer. It seems to be a very usable collection of well-maintained code. Canonical is the company behind this effort.

Remix OS

And today I’m trying something I’ve just discovered called the Remix OS for PC. It’s essentially the Android operating system for smartphones, just setup especially for a standard computer. Jide Technology appears to be the underlying developer.

At the one-hour mark: Things looked good for the first fifteen minutes or so of the installation. Unfortunately, after an hour I would guess that it’s possibly stuck. The Dell Vostro 200 appears to have an acceptable graphics adapter (Intel GMA 3100) and yet I still don’t have a full installation yet. Since the status light on the USB drive does still randomly blink perhaps it’s just taking a very long time. I’ll not interrupt it and see what happens.

At the two-hour mark: I’m still staring at the same pulsing Remix OS logo. The status light seems to indicate that progress is still happening or so I’d hope.

End-of-day: At this point I think I’m going to just let it run all night if it wants and see if it’s finished in the morning.