the power of seo

Everyone wants to sell you search engine optimization (SEO) as a service.  I’m sure there’s good money in doing that but I’ve never paid anyone for this since it’s easy enough to do yourself.  The higher you are in a Google search result, the more likely that you’ll be seen.  And the more likely you’re seen, the more likely your blog will be read.

“Roll Your Own” SEO

Believe it or not, one of my most popular blog posts of all time is “why PowerShell sucks so badly”, enjoying 743 views so far (mostly from searches in Google).  Viewing this graph, clearly something changed between Jul & Aug of 2016.

powershell-sucks

The views for this blog post were all 100% organic (unaffected by anyone’s attempts to manipulate search engine placement) before August 2016.  If you typed in “powershell sucks” into Google before this time you would have had to search page after page within their results to find any mention of my blog.

August 2016

Somewhere during that month, I noticed the popularity of this particular blog post and wanted to do an experiment.  Up until this point there might have been a total of 50 views, making it one of my most popular posts at the time.

Daily, for about a week, I visited Google and typed in “powershell sucks”, then walked through the pages of results until I found the link to my own post.  I then clicked the link and parked that browser.  (It’s important to just appear as if you’re actually reading the content because Google’s JavaScript is tracking your behavior.)

It’s only necessary to do this once per day, to be honest.  It doesn’t take much to make an otherwise-obscure blog post gain in popularity in the “eyes” of Google’s search engine.

I repeated this behavior until the blog post was listed in the top five entries of the first page of results and then let nature take its course.

The Result

Of course, the Internet loves to complain.  From this point on, the Internet-at-large would then see the blurb in Google’s search results and offer to them the promise of a rant by some distant blogger (Yours Truly).  They clicked the link, landed on the page and were instantly rewarded by a smarmy commentary on my frustrations with PowerShell.

Once this “pump” was primed by my own efforts, it was unnecessary to do anything other than to continue to write content.  Well, at least, I write content which I myself would be interested in reading.

Have I learned anything from all this?  The Internet appears to love a post whose title resonates with something they’re feeling at the moment.  For comparitive purposes, I demonstrate that “too much fun” received three views and “windows 10 sucks balls” has about 120 so far.

Do you change your blogging style to accommodate the prevailing mood of the Internet?  I wouldn’t suggest that.  Just write.  Try to find something interesting and say what you need to say.

windows-10-sucks

too-much-fun

the 21st century digital résumé

It used to be that a programmer’s résumé was a single sheet of onionskin paper (expensive, semi-transparent) with a carefully-selected collection of one’s job history and such. Parts of what you were trying to “sell” to the would-be employer were your wordprocessing and layout design skills.

Now, everyone can type, has access to printers/computers and Microsoft Word. In fact, they can even select an attractive template from the many offered so it’s not like much skill is now involved in those areas. At one time, spellchecking was an activity that involved a Webster’s dictionary. The world has changed.

Github

To be an open-source programmer, you must now have a public set of repositories on github.com or so it seems.  My collection of repositories on github.

jsfiddle

As of today, I now have my very own jsfiddle.net collection. My public dashboard on jsfiddle.

WordPress blog

More and more, programmers are encouraged to be social and outgoing enough to want to communicate to others. Obviously, you’re here already so you have my blog’s address.

Slack

And part of that “being social” requirement now seemingly includes spending a fair amount of time during your life chatting with others within the coding space. Since slack.com projects appear to be project-centric rather than coder-centric, there doesn’t appear to be a way of publicizing your identity outside of a particular team URL.

Website portfolio

And then of course, potential employers want you to highlight several existing website concepts in which you either participated or you directly own them.