why do you contribute to other’s repositories?

I’m interested to hear from other open-source coders out there. I’d like to know some of your motivations for contributing to another person’s or another team’s open-source repository. Call it a social studies experiment, if you will.

1st-Person Open-source

Here, I’m attempting to answer the question for everyone: “Why do you work on your own project in a public way and sharing your source code, knowing full-well that someone may take your code or fork your project and become rich and famous as a result?”

  1. I believe that my project has some worth for others and sharing it could make the world a better place to live in
  2. Other people might help me with my project
  3. A well-rounded github set of repositories looks good on my résumé
  4. I’m not expecting to make money from doing this
  5. Since I don’t live in America, there aren’t as many opportunities so this is my way of getting some attention from potential companies there

Let me know if I’ve missed any motivations here.

2nd/3rd-Person Open-source

This one’s a little trickier for me since I’ve been a life-time coder. In the not-so-distant past I was well-paid for working on software projects and have watched the coding salaries and the availability of programming gigs all erode.

The next question then for everyone: “Why do you work on someone else’s project in a public way, fixing their bugs and adding features, knowing full-well that some else may become rich and famous as a result?”

Case study – Github: Bloomberg reports that they recently brought in another $100M in venture capital based upon the Enterprise-level private repository revenue they’re currently earning. They’re currently valued at US$2B.

  1. I really like the other project’s code (let’s say, the Atom editor), believe in it and want it to be more awesome than it already is; since I use it myself, I’m getting something from the collaboration
  2. I want to work on a big project but I can’t otherwise get a job in a software development company so this is the next best thing; I’m getting the experience working in a software development team
  3. “Many hands make light work”; it feels good to help others; karma; “what comes around, goes around”…
  4. As a new programmer, I don’t have enough experience to start my own project yet
  5. Since I don’t live in America, there aren’t as many opportunities so this is my way of getting some attention from potential companies there; I might get hired by doing this

If I’ve missed any of your own motivations for coding on other people’s/team’s open-source projects, please add a comment here.

Some Thoughts on the Open-source Subject

What’s strange is when you have an entire team of people spread all over the planet, they’re working together on a project started by one guy (let’s say), time goes by, the project goes viral and then suddenly one day that “one guy” gets $250M in venture capital (like in the case of github). It’s valued at US$2B at the moment, btw. That’s about the same value as the New York Times.

I wonder if the investment companies realize that for the average open-source “company” this means that 1) they’re not necessarily incorporated, 2) they probably don’t have an office nor even a business checking account, 3) and anyone can fork the collection of code and start their own Atom-knockoff project if they wanted to.

And what happens to all the people whose free labor went into making github who they are today? Do they get a share of the money? No, they don’t. Do they get a job? Possibly, I suppose it all depends upon that original guy. But at this point, the power has greatly shifted from what it was before (more of a democratic society) to what it is now (more of a capitalistic corporation).

The siren call of open-source is a world which is free from capitalism. But what seems to happen is that these big projects are becoming exactly that, the thing these coders hated in the first place (or so it would seem). Open-source is supposed to be a culture. So why is it turning into nothing more than a first step to becoming a (funded) software development corporation in the end?

how cool is electron?

I’ve been working the past couple of days with Electron, a Node.js cross-platform desktop app tool which uses JavaScript, HTML and CSS to create what look like native OS-style applications for Windows, OS X and Linux.

electron_atomelectron

Cool stuff, indeed. Out-of-the-box, it looks like you publish your Electron-based app like you would anything on github:

git clone https://github.com/Somebody/Repository.git
cd Repository
npm install
npm start

But there’s also a way of downloading OS-specific images and then adding your own app into this subdirectory structure. The result is a stand-alone EXE and folderset which reasonably looks like a drop-in replacement for something you normally would build locally using Microsoft Visual Studio perhaps. In this version though, you’d run Electron.exe but there are instructions on their website for renaming your application, updating the icon’s, etc.

I’ve just used it today to build a basic music player. I wouldn’t say that the layout is as responsive as a typical mobile app’s ability to move content but I did tweak things so that it can squash down to a mini-player and it stills looks great.

mplayer

I can thank KeithIG/museeks for the open-source code behind this. They have several OS-specific downloads available if you don’t want to build this yourself.

Pros

  • This allows you to build cross-platform desktop apps in much the same way that you’d use Adobe PhoneGap, say, to build for mobile apps.
  • You code in the familiar HTML/JavaScript/CSS trilogy of disciplines and it’s Node.js centric. It is also React.js-friendly, as I’m finding on this project.
  • So far, it seems to be well-behaved.
  • If you don’t want others to easily see your code, there’s a step where you can use asar to zip-up everything into a tidy package.
  • I didn’t have to digitally-sign anything like you might have to for a Windows 10 application or for OS X, say.
  • For people who have git and npm, the install is as easy as anything you’ve seen in the open-source space and a familiar workflow.

Cons

  • Currently, I don’t see any support for mobile platforms.
  • The complete foldedset comes in a 216MB which strikes me as a little big for what it’s doing.  The app itself for the music player weighs in at 84MB of this so the remainder is everything that Electron is doing to present all this.
  • You would need to setup three different build sites to maintain a specific download for your own app.  (It’s not like PhoneGap in which you just submit the common code and Adobe builds it in the cloud.)
  • Given that you’re not digitally-signing your code, you might have to talk your users through the hurdles of having the user “trust” the content within their particular OS.
  • This might be so popular soon that none of us can really afford to just use Electron.exe by default to serve up our app; we’ll need to rename it before publishing, in other words.

Overall

I can see myself wanting to really learn this one deeply. It has a lot of potential for delivering a more native-app experience for users.