you’d think timezones would be sacrosanct

Somethings in life are supposed to be rock solid, unchanging & immutable. Not so for the list of available U.S.-based timezones as seen in Raspbian lately. In Buster, the latest operating system version (based on Debian), they decided to just arbitrarily remove a timezone selection for the United States.

Debian post

It all stems from the introduction of a second Pacific-based timezone called Pacific-New. This zone related to legislation that would have prevented daylight savings time changes to interrupt a presidential election. And yet, the bill never passed and this timezone made it into Debian (and Raspbian).

Like many users in the U.S., when presented with the two options (Pacific, Pacific-New) we selected the latter, possibly assuming that “Pacific” was some sort of designator for U.S.-islands-in-the-Pacific-which-weren’t-Hawaii.

So now with this Buster release, Pacific-New vanished into thin air and without any information to the community who support it.

But it doesn’t end there. The contents of files like /etc/timezone in Buster now don’t contain US/Pacific as one might expect. They now contain America/Los_Angeles instead. Seriously? Just think of all the shell scripts that are now buggy as a result of changes like this.

The folks from Raspbian suggest that all US/timezone​ timezones are now deprecated in lieu of America/City_Name. The entire point to having the former is that it allows pulldown menus in software to indicate a short list to the enduser. There are literally hundreds of city name entries within the America listing since it includes North, Central and South America of course.

This is a real face-palm moment for software developers and for endusers as well. Instead of selecting from perhaps five timezones, you’ll now need to select from hundreds of representative cities within two continents.

the zen of source code formatting

 

Source code—assuming for a moment that you didn’t already know this—is a collection of (often English) words and symbols for humans which usually is turned into something more meaningful for a computer to understand when the program is running. Each computer language has its own rules about how you order the words and symbols but most allow for a fair amount of leeway with respect to whitespace, the “rests within the melody”, if-you-will.

“most [computer languages] allow for a fair amount of leeway with respect to whitespace, the rests within the melody…”

“Source code formatting is the task of using that whitespace to maximize… something.”

Source code formatting is the task of using that whitespace to maximize… something. This of course means different things to different people. For some, they believe that source code formatting can be done only one way. To format code using any other method, in their mind, would be the equivalent of breaking some sort of law.

Others believe that your text editor knows best and should be the authoritarian on the matter. There’s usually a feature to “format document” which they believe always gets this right.

As someone who’s been coding now for almost forty years, I’d like to share what I’ve learned and to permission you to completely ignore those first two camps who would say that you must do it their way.

The Virus

In my humble opinion, nearly all of the source code formatting as seen in the world’s collection of code suffers from poor readability. And this is so because of the attitudes surrounding the topic as well as the self-imposed “leaders” and big players who believe their way is better, demanding adherence to their own opinions.

In many software development firms, this is a hot topic for debate. Coders feel strongly about how all this plays out. Outspoken individuals like Douglas Crockford (author of jslint) have even developed tools to enforce their own (wrong) ideas about how code must be formatted.

As large corporations like Google publish more in the open source area, they bring with them this kind of Draconian mindset. If you bring in their code, you’re very likely also bringing in format-enforcing restrictions which come along for the ride.

“If we think of jslint as a virus that self-propagates, then cloning a Google-published project has now infected your project.”

I have personally been held hostage for days trying to make the jslint build tool happy when I’ve been forced to use it. It’s one of the worst anti-patterns I’ve seen in this industry, to be honest.

An Innovative & Meaningful Method of Formatting Your Source Code

For me, I choose to maximize whitespace instead so that I may understand the code instantly. The more I understand the code, the less likely it is that I will later introduce a bug into this code. The faster I can speed-read the code, the more productive and happier I’ll be.

“Code Complete” by Steve McConnell

The genesis of this new method comes in part from my having read this excellent book at least twenty years ago. At the time, this was ground-breaking in its revelations of coding statistics with respect to bugs and the impact of good source code formatting to minimize their presence in code.

My method goes beyond the author’s original suggestions and is the work of a couple decades in the making.

A Practical Example

Below, I show a pair of examples. It is the same code, just differently formatted. The code language is JavaScript and is written for NodeJS, more specifically. The other examples below also are written in JavaScript.

Before (classic jslint-like formatting)

Screen Shot 2018-11-29 at 12.20.13 PM
Figure 1

After (new, suggested method)

Screen Shot 2018-11-29 at 12.22.26 PM
Figure 2

Hopefully you will see the appeal to the second method. The spacing in Fig. 2 allows us to quickly see that this section includes the creation of several variables by pulling them in from separate files and modules. Additionally, they are alphabetized to make it easier to spot accidental double-inclusions.

Given the column-like behavior and the symmetry of those “require” functions, it’s now much easier to scan down the list. It’s now a pleasure to read.

Before (classic jslint-like formatting)

Screen Shot 2018-11-29 at 12.30.22 PM
Figure 3

After (new, suggested method)

Screen Shot 2018-11-29 at 12.17.01 PM
Figure 4

Here, by tightening up the first/third activities to become single-line events in Fig. 4, it’s easier to then see that we have what appears to be a sandwich-like construction:

  1. fs.closeSync() something
  2. create a variable
  3. fs.closeSync() with that variable

The second activity now has some pretty radical source code formatting. But it follows the column rule introduced from before:  columns make assignments easier to scan.

1) The Column Rule

To sum this up: use consistent whitespace to create columns out of assignments (storing a value into a variable). This applies to multi-line assignments as well as to assignments which take more than one line to accomplish.

Create columns: “…use consistent whitespace to create columns out of assignments…”

2) Squash for Readability

If it is possible to remove vertical space so that an entire function may be reviewed in one screenful in your editor, then consider doing so. Good candidates for this treatment are the open/close pairs of file functions seen in Fig. 4. The pairing makes sense to most coders so it’s a welcome form of abbreviation.

Squash: “If it is possible to remove vertical space so that an entire function may be reviewed in one screenful in your editor, then consider doing so.”

3) Comment the Breadcrumb Trail

When there are several levels of braces in one group at the end of something, clearly comment each with judiciously-provided whitespace so that they line up as a column as seen in Fig. 5.

Screen Shot 2018-11-29 at 12.45.00 PM
Figure 5

Breadcrumbs: “When there are several levels of braces in one group at the end of something, clearly comment each with judiciously-provided whitespace so that they line up as a column…”

4) Semicolons for Readability

Use line-ending punctuation to tell one type of scope/block from another. In Fig. 5 above, fs.readdir() and fs.unlink() as function calls are each terminated with a semicolon after the ending brace. Here, I’m omitting the terminal semicolons for both the sections in the if blocks and the for loop at their ending braces.

Semicolons: “Use line-ending punctuation to tell one type of scope/block from another.”

I’m sure this one will have its critics. I would argue that the introduction of chained functions and the concept of “Promises” have created some rather interesting “dogpiles” of code at times which are too difficult to follow without this strategy.

Applicability to Other Languages

The suggestions indicated also apply to other languages. One notable caution, though, goes out to Python-related code which is fairly picky about beginning indentation style. The beginning of each line of Python marks logical blocks of codes as you might see in a matching pair of braces in JavaScript. It’s therefore critical to first make Python happy in this regard before attempting to then adhere to these suggestions. The continuation line technique seen in Fig. 4 above would not work in Python for this reason.

mojave, the last safe osx version?

Apple recently came out with macOS Mojave as the latest in a series of operating systems. Like most of us, you might believe that all upgrades are good upgrades. The truth is another matter entirely with respect to compatibility.

You probably didn’t know this but Apple is dropping 32-bit support in the next release.

They’ve been migrating to a full 64-bit operating system for several major versions now. You probably didn’t know this but they’re dropping 32-bit support in the next release. This is big news and it isn’t being talked about. Think of it as a means of extorting lots of money from the community of Apple developers. If those developers haven’t purchased new computers and they haven’t upgraded to the very latest version of XCode and if they haven’t paid their annual developer fees year after year then they won’t be able to exist in the next major version of OSX. Their apps just won’t work unless they comply.

What does this mean?

Simply put, perhaps a quarter of the OSX apps—especially those you have paid for—will not run anymore.

Apple’s quiet announcement

Behind-the-scenes, Apple has put up a page which warns developers what’s coming. But it’s not like they’re actually warning their own users NOT to upgrade their operating system. Of course, we’ll be nagged daily to upgrade as usual. Imagine how angry you’ll be some day in the future where you endure the typical hour-long upgrade only to find out that your Adobe Photoshop doesn’t run after the upgrade. Typical of Adobe, they’ll likely end support for the version of their software that’s only 32-bit and you’re caught in the crossfire.

How to tell

Here’s how to tell if a particular app won’t work with the next major release of OSX:

Apple menu -> About This Mac -> Software -> Applications -> select application -> 64-bit: yes/no

In this example, we see one of the pieces of programming provided by Adobe indicates “No” in that field meaning it will stop working soon.

Screen Shot 2018-11-05 at 8.41.19 AM

You can adjust the sizing of the report’s columns and then to sort by that 64-bit heading to show a list of the ones which won’t work.

Screen Shot 2018-11-05 at 8.49.41 AM

You have to laugh when you seen two of Apple’s own apps in that list and they’re responsible for their updates of course.

nasa lies… a multimedia experience

I’ve just used AI to paint a picture from the poem I’ve just penned. Technically, it’s a machine learning algorithm which attempts to generate a painting from the text it has been given. The intent is surrealism and I’d say that it’s not a bad attempt at all.

NASA paints lies with bold strokes
from a well-worn brush
rarely cleaned
from neglect and secreted away from prying eyes
NASA_lies_poem

the rise and fall of the microsoft empire

1975-1980

Our historical timeline begins in 1975 when an unlikely duo—Paul Allen as Batman and Bill Gates as his awkward “Boy Wonder”—started Microsoft Corporation.  I’m guessing that ro-sham-bo was involved in this decision but incredibly somehow Bill was made the CEO when the company got its start.  Maybe dropping out of Harvard gives you that kind of confidence.

1981BillPaul

1981-2000

Nothing really significant happened until they managed to modify an existing operating system for the IBM PC in 1981 from another company and rename this to MS-DOS. Significant sales of the IBM series of computers and those of their competitors then launched a thirty-year stretch of dominance in the business world in the area of operating systems, software and development platforms.

For most of us, we reasonably dismissed Apple’s hardware and the MacIntosh operating systems as nothing we could seriously use in business outside of the marketing department.

Consumers bought new versions of software and that license was good for life.  It could often be transferred from one computer to the next as long as the last one was de-registered first.  If you built software for Windows, you likely used a Microsoft compiler to do so and you paid for that.  In fact, the Microsoft Technet collection of CDs was quite expensive.

2001

About six years into the “Internet Tidal Wave” as Bill would call it, Microsoft was starting to lose its way.  They tried to dominate in the browser wars but never quite managed to quash the competition.  Others saw their efforts in this area as annoying.  Their software for creating programs, Visual Studio, first hit the scene about four years prior to this.

Google was founded some five years prior and was just beginning to get attention from an investor before they had anything real yet.  In 1999 they moved from their garage to an actual building in Palo Alto.  Yahoo’s popularity as a search engine from a decade ago was waning.  Google’s ad-based revenue from keywords was paying off; they’d planted a money tree which eventually created an entire forest of money trees for them.  It wouldn’t be long until Microsoft’s executives behind closed doors would consider Google their biggest threat.

About this time Apple created a very clever method of provisioning content for one-and-only-one device within the music-delivery space.  The iTunes store would turn out to be the goose that laid the golden egg, as seen in the following revenues.  And yet, it would take years for either Microsoft or Google to realize the beauty in this fulfillment model and to come up with their own versions.

showmethemoney

The “Internet of Things” concept started gaining in popularity at this time.

2009

Microsoft’s attempts at copying Google’s success (MSN Search, Windows Live Search, Live Search) now culminated in the introduction of Bing as their default search engine destination for all things Microsoft.

Apple introduced the first iPhone and the first iPad about this time, noting that the same provisioning model from iTunes was incorporated into both via iOS.  The subscription model of sofware licensing was born with this, if you think about it.  If you wanted to write a program for either, you needed to use Apple’s software to do so.

Google has just introduced Chrome as a browser and would begin their campaign to slowly break Internet Explorer.  The same was true of the Android phone and its related operating system.  It would take a few years for Microsoft to catch up to either the iPhone or the Android before releasing their own app-savvy smartphone offering.

Amazon some three years prior had introduced the beginning of what would be a full complement of cloud-based services to support web development.  It would take Microsoft two full years to realize that they needed to be in this space and they didn’t have their offering ready for a few years more, too late to effectively compete.

Github.com had just celebrated their first year online, hosting over 46,000 repositories by then.  The world of open source was the very antonym to the way that software had been developed prior to this.

The free Ubuntu operating system was released about four years prior to this, backed by the well-funded company Canonical.

2015

Microsoft releases Windows 10, “the last version of Windows” (they claimed).  Rumors suggested that Windows would eventually go from a version-based license model to an annual-subscription model with respect to pricing.  I think it’s safe to say that the market hasn’t really embraced either Windows 8 or Windows 10.

The subscription-based model for Office 365 was introduced four years prior to this so the writing was definitely on the wall:  Microsoft wanted to depart from their former methods of making money and to chase the monthly subscription model.

2015-popular-coding-languages

The world of open source was offering new programmers a wealth of free code.  All they had to do was to take it and make it their own.  Formerly, Microsoft-friendly coding languages like C, C++, C#, VB and .NET dominated the playing field but this graphic shows how the game had changed.

2017

And here we are, present-day.  That curious number 42 now describes the number of years that Microsoft has been around.

Yesterday evening, I attended a very geeky meetup of perhaps fifty or sixty coders and only saw one Windows-based laptop.  Almost everyone had a MacBook of some kind.

I just spent about two hours today installing the free Visual Studio Community 2017 software so that I could—in theory, anyway—alter a free copy of the source code for TightVNC software.  Out of the box, so-to-speak, Visual Studio doesn’t want me to build this project since it uses an earlier target platform (Windows 7 or 8, one would assume).

Microsoft only wants me to make things for Windows 10.

So rather than making it easy for me to build a program that will happily work with Windows 7, they’re forcing me to jump through hoops in order to add the necessary pieces for this to happen.

Add two more hours to this and I find that my installation does not want to download the earlier pieces to allow this to happen.  I’m forced to then upgrade the code to Windows 10 compatibility mode… only to find that the build fails with 528 errors.

The main crux of all these errors appear to be:  “we can’t find common files”.  It’s a very amateur sort of error from a company that’s been providing compilers for several decades now.

I have to think that Microsoft doesn’t want me to do anything with Visual Studio unless it benefits Microsoft.  And this is the core of the reason why I suggest that they’re doomed.

Every time a coder like myself runs into obstacles like these, the usual seed that’s planted inside their head is “this would be easier with another free compiler or another language from someone else”.

2022

Fast-forward another five years and Microsoft will have lost ground on many fronts.  New software development here, there and everywhere will be via some language which wasn’t popularized by Microsoft on computers which aren’t Windows and with browsers which aren’t Internet Explorer or Edge.  Our toasters and refrigerators and our cars will be powered by the Ubuntu operating system or perhaps Debian, a similar free Linux flavor.  These appliances will be connected to our wi-fi and even to the Internet but there won’t be a scrap of anything Microsoft about them.  They’ll be coded up with something that isn’t C#, doesn’t use .NET and doesn’t need Visual Studio in order to compile it.

The only thing with a Microsoft pedigree with some staying power could be some of the websites and services currently served up at Microsoft’s datacenters via Azure.  But Amazon or Google could kill that by simply lowering their own prices for cloud-based services.

the 21st century digital résumé

It used to be that a programmer’s résumé was a single sheet of onionskin paper (expensive, semi-transparent) with a carefully-selected collection of one’s job history and such. Parts of what you were trying to “sell” to the would-be employer were your wordprocessing and layout design skills.

Now, everyone can type, has access to printers/computers and Microsoft Word. In fact, they can even select an attractive template from the many offered so it’s not like much skill is now involved in those areas. At one time, spellchecking was an activity that involved a Webster’s dictionary. The world has changed.

Github

To be an open-source programmer, you must now have a public set of repositories on github.com or so it seems.  My collection of repositories on github.

jsfiddle

As of today, I now have my very own jsfiddle.net collection. My public dashboard on jsfiddle.

WordPress blog

More and more, programmers are encouraged to be social and outgoing enough to want to communicate to others. Obviously, you’re here already so you have my blog’s address.

Slack

And part of that “being social” requirement now seemingly includes spending a fair amount of time during your life chatting with others within the coding space. Since slack.com projects appear to be project-centric rather than coder-centric, there doesn’t appear to be a way of publicizing your identity outside of a particular team URL.

Website portfolio

And then of course, potential employers want you to highlight several existing website concepts in which you either participated or you directly own them.

sexism in the codespace

Lately, there’s been a push to convince girls to learn how to be software developers. Inside these initiatives, the individuals who are part of the movement are attempting to empower people to achieve more with their lives. I would suggest that this is the best part of this new idea.

But what if you pulled back the curtain to reveal that there’s a secret business reason behind all of this outside these initiatives? What if big business is the real driving force here? What could they possibly want out of potentially doubling the workforce within the software development space? Obviously they want what they already have in the clothing industry: sweatshops.

“What could they [big business] possibly want out of potentially doubling the workforce within the software development space? Obviously they want what they already have in the clothing industry: sweatshops.”

sweatshopnoun

A factory, especially in the clothing industry, where manual workers are employed at very low wages for long hours and under poor conditions.

Think about it for a moment. Is Google [US$90B/year] such an Andy Griffith—friendly company that it wants to empower young girls to realize their potential… or does it want more profits?

Simple economics at work

The economics of supply and demand suggest that if you double the supply of software developers then the price for software development projects will reasonably be half. If Google can flood the marketplace with coders then the price for development should plummet as a result.

The following photo is a typical Nike factory. You might ask yourself why all of the factory workers are young girls. Well, they work for a fraction of the cost of their male or older counterparts in the workforce. And given what we know about dominance and submissiveness, young girls will more likely just do what you tell them to do without rebelling (against horrible working conditions, for example).

nike

Sexism

Imagine how you’d feel if suddenly boys and men were being “sold” this idea that they should be coding right now at the same rate that young girls are being advertised to. It would seem weird and creepy, actually. A quick Google search will show you just how many of these girls + coding websites, organizations and meetups have recently been spawned.

A great litmus test for sexism, racism or any “-ism” is to just change out the race and gender, for example. If the result sounds wrong then by definition the original was also wrong for the same reasons.

Examples from actual websites

Here, I make those changeouts to highlight what I’m seeing:

http://www.girlswhocode.com => http://www.boyswhocode.com

http://www.girldevelopit.com => http://www.boydevelopit.com

http://www.blackgirlscode.com => http://www.whiteboyscode.com

If the changed-out version sounds politically-incorrect then the original is by definition just as wrong.

Who to trust

So who do you trust at the end of the day? On one side you have a number of friendly-sounding organizations who seem to be working to make things better for girls and women. On the other side you have a collection of corporations who have a habit of maximizing their profits by using unsustainable working conditions.

Feel free to join the software development field regardless of your gender or race. Just don’t be fooled by big business into working in a coding sweatshop, if you will, because you’re desperate for work and because you lack the confidence that some of your co-workers possess.

magnetic card readers

Continuing in the series of fun recycling projects for these Dell Vostro 200 computers, I purchased a MagTek Dynamag USB-based swipe card reader for a new project to track visitors in the office’s entrance.

dynamag

Overview

The solution includes an Ubuntu server which only runs a single application to receive the card swipe details, to find the Track 1 data and to then submit this information to a Microsoft IIS—based website. The pages here then offer up an API for the incoming card swipe details and an administrative page for registering new visitors, reviewing the log details and the visitors as seen, to include the ability to export those details to Excel. The data is stored in a Microsoft SQL Server database.

To save cost, I decided to have each visitor just use a magnetic swipe card already in their wallet. In this way, I wouldn’t have to buy a magnetic card encoder, purchase card blanks nor worry about designing or issuing them (or trying to get them back later).

Typical Cost of an Access Control System for Visitors

From this webpage 2016 Average Card Access Cost

“Expect to pay an average of $1,500 to $2,500 per door for a high-quality system for up to 150 people. … It will cost an average of $1,000 to $1,500 for the hardware for the door. It will cost an average of $3 to $5 per keycard. Monthly service fees can range from $10 to $100 per month.”

My total cost for this project was just eight hours’ labor plus the $48.36 for the card reader! This included the database and website coding plus the I.T. work to setup the Ubuntu server and to create the Python script to talk to the USB-based reader, to test everything and to write up the documentation. This isn’t bad, considering the cost of an average system.

digital inflation

I spent most of the morning retiring an old Compaq Presario server; it’s perhaps fifteen years old. It was in with some things in storage and I thought I’d get rid of it since the hardware wasn’t even compatible with an Ubuntu server install attempt.

Less Was More

I realize in going through the motions of archiving all my many coding projects from years ago just how much bloat we’ve taken into our computers and our computer languages these days. I think the laptop I’m on right now has 8GB of RAM and this NT 4.0 Server only had 384MB of RAM, running instances of IIS, SQL Server, NT Server, WINS, DNS Server as well as a VSS server. It also hosted QuickBooks Pro 99, Adobe Photoshop 5.0 LE and Visual Studio. Come to think of it, it also easily ran my own NT services, custom-made IIS ISAPI filters and custom SQL Server extended stored procedures that I’d written. It had Microsoft Office, Adobe Acrobat and Illustrator, Flash-development tools by Macromedia.

It ran all this on 384MB of memory.  And those fifteen prolific years’ worth of accumulated everything only resulted in about 4GB of storage, perhaps the equivalent of a mere three movies on my laptop now. I almost have to laugh as I store it on a terabyte external drive.

Digital Inflation

graph

Seriously, though, what have we gained by making everything so heavy? I recall being able to accomplish anything I needed to do in that older version of Adobe Photoshop and using a fraction of that 384MB of memory. Just now, it took Adobe Photoshop CC about five minutes to load up so that I could paste this graphic in and start to work on it. I select the Spot Healing tool and begin clicking.  One, two, three… and then I wait as the tool freezes up and I have to wait for the spinning cursor to resolve itself. I then Step Backward to remove the garbage that the tool added and try to repeat, only this time slower. This sucks. I know that older version from over ten years ago didn’t do this.

So now, every day we get faster and faster microprocessors with multiple cores. But that Windows 10 upgrade from this year demanded that we have no less than 4GB of RAM just to install it. Why?

The answer is that we’re under a form of inflation that’s taken over the digital world. The same resources we had last year just aren’t good enough.

Back in this post I suggested that open source projects are suffering from this bloat, too. Big companies like Google believe that programs have to be big to be good. I disagree. Sometimes quality and project size are in direct opposition with each other. The more code you have, the more code that could be potentially bad.

Who Do We Blame?

Is it the microprocessor manufacturers who are behind this? I don’t think so. How about the operating system makers like Microsoft and Apple? Probably. I do know that .Net is a huge, bloated layer of code that’s supposed to be Microsoft’s version of Java. But the reason for both Java and .Net is to write machine-independent code. And since nobody really writes .Net code to run on an Apple computer or on a Unix box then what’s the point?

And now that .Net has seen its heyday Microsoft is ready to do the “new, new thing” which is to chase Apple’s app-based iTunes-delivered store. So we as consumers picked up this thick layer of code in the form of .Net which honestly does little for us. And yet most of the software written for a Windows-based computer has to use this foundation. No wonder it takes so much to do so little.

I’d like to blame Adobe’s bloat on all the code which is designed to permission their new subscription-based model. Try to buy Adobe Acrobat now and you’re left with the choice of paying $500 or something like $20-per-month. Neither option is worth it, in my humble opinion. Much of that startup lag I mentioned before could be the client app talking to mothership Adobe to see if my licensing this month is paid.

Predictions

Honestly, the pendulum has to swing back the other way. Consumers will reject subscription-based pricing models, will turn in greater numbers to open source operating systems and desktop tools and eventually the big players will come back with their apologies and revised ideas about how to win back their former customers.

In earlier times you couldn’t expect an average computer person to use a command line interface. But younger computer users are trained in public school and they’re not so timid. Strangely enough, Microsoft is turning to a similar mechanism to do advanced things in their software using PowerShell commands. And there is even an option to install their server software without a GUI environment at all… like a UNIX server, if you think about it.

The original IBM PC didn’t have a Windows interface since that didn’t come until many years later. The very popular (free) Ubuntu server software now does the same. You’d be surprised how much work the computer can do when it’s not unnecessarily displaying graphics.

I believe that we’ll eventually build simpler interfaces. The Windows 10 “Metro” menu and those of smartphones now are visually simpler if you think about it. They’re essentially flat squares that you can push with your finger rather than the fussy-little, 3D-styled buttons from twenty years ago in Windows 95.

Hardware like Google Glass may remove the need for such specialized interfaces. Since this hardware doesn’t include a keyboard your ability to interact with the interface is limited to pointing your head toward a spot on the screen and holding it until it’s selected. When they add voice commands to this interface we’ll see yet another revolution in how we expect software to behave. Hopefully we’ll get to the point where there are no more buttons to push—all commands would be accomplished verbally in your own language of choice.

Back to simpler interfaces, however, must we have all the visual candy? Could we not focus on the work to be done, the spoken commands to trigger that work and remove everything else but the text-based status? On today’s hardware we could do that now if we really wanted to. But since companies like Apple/Microsoft/Google want their store-like delivery model we’ll likely not get what we want unless we build it ourselves.