old-fashioned milk bottles

Once upon a time, you’d get milk delivered in the morning in glass bottles. Okay, honestly, it was other people who got that but I do know this from watching old movies.

milkman

Now that I’m old enough to go shopping myself, I have a fondness for buying my milk in bottles like this. For most people, I’d guess, the thought of adding an extra $2 for the glass rubs them the wrong way. For me, I see it as an excellent way of picking up a great deal. It would cost about $10.84 for that same glass two-quart container from Amazon.

Re-use, recycle, re-invent

So what would I do with the extra bottle? Almost anything that can fit through the top is a good candidate but food is what I primarily store in mine. I have at least 30 bottles storing dry goods, two storing refrigerated drinks and perhaps eight storing filtered water.

When I make waffles, I usually mix up several batches of the batter and that will go into the pint-sized glass bottle. Turbinado sugar also goes into the pint-sized version, making it easy to spoon straight out from there.

I purchase the Mueller’s pot-sized spaghetti which fits nicely into the quart-sized bottles. Most flours as packaged by Bob’s Red Mill will exactly fill the quart-sized version. Potato flakes? Check. Granola? Check.

I have rows of beans and lentils, pastas of all shapes, flours, starches, coconut flakes and almond slices. There’s trailmix in one. I have semolina, masa, corn meal, oatmeal, Scottish oats and Creme of Wheat.

In the refrigerator today I just added two quarts of iced tea and a quart of iced coffee. Three visits to a local coffee shop would probably set me back $12 for three drinks and I’ve just stored away the same amount for a fraction of that cost.

Perhaps the best benefit of storing most of your pantry in glass is that you no longer have to deal with pests. This is the first time in my life that I have literally zero bugs trying to eat my food.

Enter the 3D printer

The tie-in, then, to the 3D printer involves me designing a replacement funnel using Autodesk Fusion 360 for the purchased funnel I’ve used up until now. Hopefully it turns out, it’s about as big as my printer could do.

The previous funnel was okay but it wasn’t a great fit for the bottle. Big items like granola would constantly get stuck in the too-small funnel neck. This one should fit perfectly.

Screen Shot 2018-07-09 at 4.03.41 PM

Food safety and plastic

Some of you may then caution about the use of printed plastic in conjunction with food. I’m sure the PLA filament (which is made of a polymer of corn starch) is actually closer to be food-safe than the funnel which I’d purchased from a car parts store earlier.

Some of the typical concerns with food versus printed plastic is that the small grooves in the plastic allow for bacteria to grow. Okay, but this is the same for most of the plastic utensils which we routinely include in our kitchen, right?

Another concern is regarding the existence of lead in some of the nozzles used. Yes, but that must be so minuscule as to be outside of the realm of concern. In response, I could site the many harsh chemicals used in the processing of naturally-green soybeans to create an unnaturally-white soy milk product, for example.

For dry goods, the PLA funnel should be a non-issue. With reasonable cleaning I think that it will do fine with liquids as well as long as I don’t use it to funnel boiling water, for example.