experience is simply the name we give our mistakes

September 14, 2017 | Microsoft News Center

REDMOND, Wash. — Sept 13, 2017 — Microsoft Corp. on Wednesday announced that the Windows 10 software — with a slow start so far in customer satisfaction — will get a new name soon.  Terry Myerson, executive vice president, Windows and Devices Group explains:

“I think most of us at Microsoft felt that the Windows 10 name didn’t adequately describe what we were trying to achieve with this operating system. This new name should make it clear what Windows can ultimately do for our customers and how we at Microsoft focus on getting them the best experience possible with instantaneous, streaming updates 24×7 to your desktop, mobile or any device.”

Windows 10 to be renamed

To celebrate the new continuous update feature, Microsoft is renaming Windows 10 to coincide with the upcoming fall update. “The new name is our commitment to up-to-date software, no matter what it takes”, added Terry. “There’s no such thing as too many updates, at least that’s how we think. Our customers shouldn’t have to wait for something as important as a new version of Candy Crush Soda Saga. If we had our way, you’d have the next version of the Microsoft Solitaire Collection app before it’s even been tested by our own QA. Now that’s fresh software.”

“In the past, Windows Update took a back seat to most of what was going on in the computer, like… running a Word document. We feel that updating is much more important than almost anything that our customers could imagine doing with a computer so we are now putting that in the driver’s seat, if you will.”

Windows Update 10

The newly-named Windows Update 10 operating system is a bold new experience for users. With a streamlined, uncluttered interface, customers should find it easy to keep their system up-to-date and all without those unnecessary icons.

Win10

One of the best ways to get the Windows Update 10 update is to upgrade to Windows Update 10 by clicking the following link. More information can be found at https://www.microsoft.com/windows/windows-update-10-upgrade.

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) is the leading platform and productivity company for the mobile-first, cloud-first world, and its mission is to update every computer and every organization’s computers on the planet to have the very freshest copy of the X-Box app since we want to sell things online like Apple. All your base are belong to us.

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com.Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication, but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://news.microsoft.com/microsoft-public-relations-contacts. Stop reading this and update your computer. I’m sure there’s a new version that you missed.

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over the mount’n

Okay, that was a terrible pun. I thought I’d share something today which is pretty cool although it gets a little technical at the end. You can actually edit the files on a tiny microSD card like you might have in some device like a 3D printer or similar. And you don’t have to have it running (like in your product/device) in order to do so.

Smart Things (IoT)

We live in a world of ever-smarter things. There’s a new term, the Internet of Things (IoT) which basically means that lots of the products we’re using now not only have little computers inside, but they also use the Internet in some way.

Tiny Hard Drives

Given the diminutive size of some of these new products, they often use the microSD card as an actual hard drive. These days, they include an entire operating system which boots up the product’s computer and provides a variety of functionality.

microsd

The Bleeding Edge

For some of us, we like to install the very latest version of software for something like this. Those updates sometimes come in the form of an entire image file for the microSD card in this case.

Instructions for editing files on an image file itself

Okay, so I have downloaded an image for a Raspberry Pi computer and the version name is Jessie. The name of the operating system itself which runs on this computer is called Raspbian, btw. The image’s filename is then raspbian-jessie.img, easy enough.

I’m running these commands on a Linux-compatible computer:


$ file raspbian-jessie.img

raspbian-jessie.img: DOS/MBR boot sector; partition 1 : ID=0xc, start-CHS (0x0,130,3), end-CHS (0x8,138,2), startsector 8192, 129024 sectors; partition 2 : ID=0x3, start-CHS (0x8,138,3), end-CHS (0x213,120,37), startsector 137216, 8400896 sectors

So we’re interested in only one number here, that value after startsector for partition 2, namely 137216. Multiply that by 512 to get 70254592 which we use in the next command:

$ sudo mount raspbian-jessie.img -o offset=70254592 /mnt

This means, essentially, “open up the file indicated (at an offset of 7 million or so characters into that file) and show me everything that’s in it and put that in the /mnt folder area”.

So now, you can actually edit the image’s computer name in the /mnt/etc/hostname file, for example. Assuming we have done so, we now unmount the file:

$ sudo umount /mnt

And you’ve managed to edit its internal files in place! The typical activity next is to burn that image to another microSD, put it into your smart refrigerator’s computer or whatever and boot it up.

Conclusion

Okay, so you’re not as excited as I am but this is a giant leap forward in workflow for me. Since I maintain several of these image files, this is pretty cool stuff.

Imagine if you were trying to build a supercomputer with a hundred individual (small) computers and it were necessary to then build 100 different image files each with their own setup. This would be so not fun if you had to do this manually. Using this new method, you could script all this and then run it.  By the end of some lengthy process, you would have all hundred different image files as produced by this method. Huzzah…, right?

so many operating systems, so little time

Sometimes you need to do many things with the same hardware. Say, for example, you might need both Windows 10 and a Linux-type of operating system on the same computer. Here are some of your options for this.

You might say, “why would I want that?” There are times when you want to try out something new. You might need to test software compatibility with something you don’t have currently. You might purchase some new software or a printer which isn’t compatible with your current setup. Or, like me, you might be endlessly curious about the possibilities. You might want to create a smartphone app and need to see how that looks on a variety of phones.

Boot from a “Live” media

In this case, you have Ubuntu on a CD or on a USB thumb drive. You boot to this media and select the live option from the menu (“Try Ubuntu without installing”). You then get a Desktop experience running Ubuntu (Linux) on your existing hardware and you don’t even have to install it in the classical sense. Once you shutdown this system and remove the media, nothing whatsoever has changed on your original hard drive.

TryUbuntu

I’ve used both methods (CD and USB) and will attest that the latter will boot up faster than anything you’ve seen before, I’d guess.

Pros:

  • It’s very fast to boot this way from the USB drive.
  • You can try another operating system without making any changes whatsoever to your existing computer.
  • It makes short work of hacking a Windows-based computer if you don’t know the password(s) and accessing the files on its partitions.
  • It seems to be wonderfully compatible with a variety of computers and laptops without fussing with drivers.
  • Each session takes advantage of all the available RAM.

Cons:

  • Unless you change the defaults, any changes to your Desktop and configuration are lost upon restarting this session.

Set up two partitions and select one upon startup

In this case, you shrink the size of your existing hard drive’s partition to make room for another operating system.  You then install the new operating system to this second partition.

Upon restarting the computer, you then select which partition (operating system) you’d prefer.

GRUB

This technique is often called “dual booting”.

Pros:

  • The settings you change will be saved from one session to the next.
  • In many cases, you can access files on the other partition(s) if you know where to look.
  • You can take advantage of fast hardware like that on an Apple computer to use other operating systems like Linux.
  • Technically, you could install Windows 7 on one partition and Windows 10 on another.
  • This technique can be extended to many operating systems on many partitions.
  • Each session gets all the available RAM.

Cons:

  • You have to reboot in order to get back to the other operating system to use its tools and software.
  • In the case of OS X, major version upgrades usually try to overwrite the menu at the beginning which would normally allow you to select the other partitions. It’s almost as if Apple doesn’t want you to do this and breaks things on purpose, of course. If you’re technically-minded, you can fix this each time however.

Set up a virtual manager (VM) and “spin up” an operating system

This seems to be the preferred and newest method these days. You run a virtual machine manager, create a virtual computer using this technique and then install the new operating system to this.

QEMU

You then boot up the virtual computer and you see this as a window on your Desktop.

XP

Pros:

  • You can copy/paste from a Windows application into a Linux session’s Terminal session or any similar combination of from/to.
  • For demonstrations, you can easily show that something works with multiple operating systems (without rebooting or bringing multiple laptops).
  • Depending upon how much hard drive space, RAM and processor speed you have, you could potentially run several virtual machines at once.

Cons:

  • Technically, it’s the most challenging of the various options and the learning curve is steep.
  • It may require more RAM memory than what you currently have for this to run well.

Progress so far

I have plenty of experience using the first two methods above (live- and dual-boot) but have recently been working with the VM option, as described below.

Dual-boot MacBook

I’ve setup my MacBook Pro to boot both OS X and Ubuntu. It seems to work great so far. I hope to next setup a VM so that I can emulate a Raspberry Pi computer within the MacBook itself (for development purposes).

HP Laptop

I’ve setup my HP laptop to boot Ubuntu and have added a VM which has Windows 10 loaded in it. Remarkably, the Windows 10 install actually works better than the original (native) installation on this laptop.

Multi-boot Raspberry Pi computers (IoT re-purposing)

Since the Raspberry Pi (3 and Zero) computers have an easily-replaceable microSD card in them, I now have a small library of different images with which I may boot any individual computer. It’s just important to label each to avoid confusion.

So I might pull the microSD card for the robotic tank project out of a Raspberry Pi, replace it with the card for the closed ecosystem or for a different project altogether. Once it boots, it’s now a completely different computer, if you will.

microSD

Multi-boot 3D printer

Technically, the Robo C2 printer has a Raspberry Pi computer inside so it makes it easy to boot to different versions of the software. This is useful when you’re modifying things to add on new features, for example.

Smartphone software on a workstation

I’ve also had the opportunity of installing Android on a standard Dell Vostro 200 desktop computer. (It’s good for testing software and websites.)

Cloud-based alternatives

There are entire services available at Microsoft, Amazon and presumably Google in which you “spin up” a virtual computer and remote into it.

Amazon’s offering is called EC2 and I’ve had the opportunity to use it in the past. In the span of two hours, I was able to spin up or “instantiate” a virtual SQL Server in a datacenter somewhere, to upload a corrupt database, fix it there and then to download it back to me. I then killed that virtual server. The total cost was something like $4 to “borrow” their virtual hardware for a couple of hours. Compare this to the cost of purchasing an actual server, paying for Microsoft licensing, waiting for everything to arrive, setting it up, etc. I literally saved thousands of dollars with a service like this.

Microsoft’s offering is called Azure. I can’t say that I’ve used it yet but it works essentially in the same way that EC2 does: define an instance, spin it up and remote into it.

Looks like Google’s offering is their Compute Engine. It sounds like they’re trying to play “catch up” to both Amazon/Microsoft on this one.

There’s another player in this space, MacInCloud.com appears to be offering remote sessions into what are likely discreet/physical Apple computers. For all practical purposes, it would likely behave like a virtual computer might.

Private cloud

And finally, I had the opportunity to re-purpose about eight Dell Vostro 200 computers from work into a MaaS (metal as a service) private cloud. The underlying layer of software which did the cloud part is called OpenStack which allows you—like Amazon itself perhaps—to be the host for spinning up virtual servers.

It takes a lot of work to get the initial one or two computers running for this. But then, using a concept called Juju charms, you select what are essentially recipes of things to install which have complicated inter-dependencies and it seems to make it all work for you. Seeing these things run is pretty impressive given that this is in the free, open-space world.

The future

It’s hard to guess what’s next in this series of events. We may soon be running a VM with Windows 10 on a wearable single-board computer like the Raspberry Pi 3 or similar. In theory, then, you might wear a pair of Google Glass(es) or the Microsoft HoloLens which would interface with the Pi computer via Bluetooth. Given the lack of a keyboard, presumably the interface might be like the Amazon Echo/Alexa service: you ask for something, the system must recognize the command, submit it to a server and display the results or iterate through them via voice.

And yet, given the augmented reality (AR) side of things, you might say “keyboard” and a virtual reality keyboard could appear on the physical horizontal space in front of you and you just “type” on an imaginary keyboard to input data.

The interfaces could evolve to project these virtual keyboard-type interfaces onto an imaginary glass wall in front of you, much the same as you see in sci-fi movies these days. These glass-like devices probably would incorporate an outward-facing camera to catch and interpret your hand movements into discreet commands like typing, page-forward, scroll-down, dismiss window, etc.

GoogleGlassHololens

ubuntu bash now in windows 10…?

There’s a little-known feature now in Windows 10 which is a fairly awesome piece if you know Linux/Ubuntu and, say, you’re a coder. Microsoft and Canonical got together to add an Ubuntu on Windows subsystem in the 14393.0 “Anniversary Update” OS Build.

The feature is also called the Windows Subsystem for Linux. What’s interesting is that from bash you can actually invoke a Windows executable or one compiled for Ubuntu. It can run DOS batch files as well as shell scripts.

  1. Turn on Developer Mode in Windows 10 -> Settings -> Update & Security -> For developers
  2. Turn on the Windows Subsystem for Linux (Beta) in Windows 10 -> search for “Turn Windows features” -> select Turn Windows features on or off
  3. Restart Windows 10
  4. Go to a command prompt
  5. Enter bash and type a y to continue, noting that this step will take about 20 minutes
  6. When finally prompted, enter a UNIX username (it’s case-sensitive) and a password (again, case-sensitive) which are completely separate from your other credentials

From this point you can run an Ubuntu bash prompt either from the added Start entry or by entering bash in an MS-DOS or PowerShell prompt.

Notes

  • It’s probably not a good idea to use Notepad or similar Windows tools to edit configuration files within the Ubuntu space.
  • You should be able to sudo from this first user as you might expect.
  • Once logged in, you’ll land in a /mnt/c/Users/username location from a Unix perspective.
  • Since the OS is Ubuntu, you would run sudo apt-get update to install things.
  • If you want to invoke Windows executables from a bash session, you probably want to start by adding the SYSTEM32 folder to your path, for example: export PATH=$PATH:/mnt/c/Windows/System32 but since this is UNIX you’ll need to make sure that the capitalization is right for each path.
  • Run lsb_release -a if you’d like to see which release of Ubuntu is running.
  • In theory, you could run bash scripts within a PowerShell script.
  • At this time, it does not support GUI applications.

windows 10 from vm on ubuntu

If you’ve been reading my blog for any time whatsoever, you know that I have been irritated with Microsoft lately. I purchased a new HP laptop with Windows 8, upgraded it immediately to 8.1 Pro and then took advantage of the free upgrade to Windows 10 Pro.

Things seem to work out okay for a bit. I must admit my frustration at Microsoft for trying to be just like Apple. The Microsoft Store mentality, the logging in via Internet-based credentials rather than local credentials, the inability to innovate rather than to just copy. It’s a little sad, actually. There was a time when Microsoft led the industry and now they can’t make a move unless they’re mimicking something that Apple’s already done.

And yet, Microsoft is still the leader in business applications for the moment.

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

After some ugly automated update that left my laptop is a non-working status, I decided after three months of this that I needed something else. I reformatted the hard drive completely and installed the free operating system Ubuntu Desktop. It’s nearly bullet-proof at this point. There is a manageable glitch regarding the ethernet adapter after a Restart but I’ve got a work-around. (And I’ve installed it on many other computers without this issue—it seems to be related to the wi-fi adapter only.)

Virtual Machine Manager

I was playing around with its features today and remembered that it includes a working VM solution. You can create a virtual machine, spin it up and run it from Ubuntu. I wondered if I could then run Windows 10 Pro again in a VM session on this same laptop.

WindowsOnUbuntu

Windows 10 Pro in a Virtual Machine

Why yes I can. (As in “been there, done that”.) The actual download of the ISO image of Windows 10 took more time than the actual installation itself. Here’s the overview of that install.

  1. Download an ISO image for Windows 10 and indicate your language choice
  2. In Ubuntu, select the Search item and look for Virtual Machine, selecting Virtual Machine Manager
  3. Create a new virtual machine, selecting the ISO file from the first step
  4. Give it at least 20248 RAM and at least 16GB hard drive space (I initially selected 3072 and 80 for these)
  5. Go with the defaults and give your VM a name, I chose Win10Pro for this
  6. Watch it go through the standard Windows 10 Pro installation and at the Product Key entry screen choose the option to do that later
  7. It will quickly run through the installation (much faster than it normally would or so it would seem)

Activating It On-the-Cheap

I followed the prompts afterwards to see what Microsoft wanted to charge on their Store for a legitimate Product Key. Microsoft wanted $199.99 for this.

So I searched on Google for anything less than this and wasn’t disappointed. eCrater just sold me the same thing for $10. They provided the Product Key, I entered it in and it’s now activated without any hassle.

Oddities

Since this is one of my first forays into VM on Ubuntu, I’ll note a couple of strange things which I saw.

  • Choosing the full-screen option seems to select a more squarish/middle part of the laptop’s screen rather than using its entirety.  I will likely have to research this or just ignore it.
  • Once in full-screen mode it’s not apparent how one gets out of that and back to Ubuntu.  It looks like pressing Ctl-Alt may bring down an upper menu. I’ve also heard that Ctl-Alt-F seems to toggle the cursor out of the VM window’s control. I was ultimately able to toggle from full-screen AND be able to move the cursor from its window, (a major breakthrough).

That said, I was able to finish up a session running Windows 10 Pro and then within that window, shut it down as you might normally do. The Virtual Machine Manager then informed me that this VM was down.  It’s possible then to alter the VM’s device settings, say, to change the available amount of RAM.

And the next time I need Windows, I can just spin up the virtual machine image again. I’m thinking that this is better than multi-booting, as I’ve done in the past. (I’m looking at my dual-boot MacBook with Ubuntu on it.)

Believe It Or Not…

The original Windows 10 Pro networking bug isn’t seen in this Windows-on-Ubuntu setup. It actually works… better?

I guess I’ll need to use it more to find out but it somehow seems faster than I remember. How is that even possible? Before, the native-mode Windows 10 Pro had access to all 6MB of RAM and now, it has only 3MB. Granted, I haven’t tried to run several programs at once on it and I haven’t installed Office 365, for example. We’ll see. I’ll keep an eye on it and let you know.

windows 10 sucks balls

Seriously. So today’s saga ends with me giving up on my relatively-new Windows 10—based laptop as just a lost cause. Since around November, it’s had its microprocessor firmly stuffed up its I/O port.

The Symptoms

The symptoms began about the same time. The Mail app just failed to sync: no new email.

Further troubleshooting suggested that the wi-fi adapter wasn’t consistently connecting to my own zone and not that of one of my neighbors. Tracking down the correct settings allowed me to definitely not connect to that other zone. Although that worked, still no resolution of the problem.

I thought updating might help. Unfortunately, Windows Update thought that it wasn’t connected to the Internet so I couldn’t update. I could browse the Internet with my browser but it just didn’t think that I was connected to the Internet.

The Attempts

I tried using only the wi-fi. I tried using only an Ethernet connection. Same result.

I tried opening an administrative MS-DOS console and entering a variety of terse commands in an effort to clear my DNS cache, reset my IP adapter’s DHCP lease, reset the WINS catalog, you-name-it.

I tried rebooting. Oh yeah, I rebooted the fuck out of that thing. Still, no-go.

I wanted to adjust the network’s location so that instead of thinking that I’m in a public space, it would know that I’m in a private place. But since it thinks I’m not connected, you can’t do that.

The Research

It turns out that I’m not the only one experiencing this. Almost 70,000 viewers on one Microsoft help page alone and thousands of participants in the discussion. Keep in mind that a subset of the users think that this is an email problem, another just-as-large collection of users think that their Windows Update has a problem, another several thousand think that they have a Firewall problem, another several thousand think that they have an Ethernet adapter problem…, (you get the point).

It looks to me like Microsoft has painted themselves into a corner. If Windows Update now doesn’t function, then you can’t easily push out a fix. You then have to rely upon the millions of users to ask you for help.

The Fix

Fortunately, it hit upon me how I could fix the problem which I now share with you.

buy-a-macbook

Update

Now that I’ve formatted the HP laptop with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, I’ve been able to spin up a virtual machine and run Windows 10 Pro in it… and it doesn’t have the aforementioned bug.  Read more

android os

I got tantalizingly close with Android OS on this attempt, manually creating my own USB install disk with the very good UBootin open-source software. I can see now that the folks from Remix OS had customized both code bases for their own use in an attempt to make things easier but fell short, it would seem.  UBootin appears to allow you to create almost any sort of live/install USB drive and well worth the time spent with it.

I managed to “live boot” (without installing) Android OS from my USB drive only to find that the Google Play Service appears to be crashing on the Dell Vostro 200 upon initialization, a known bug. The software appears to expect that 1) I have cellphone service, 2) I have wi-fi. I have neither and it doesn’t seem to know how to drive forward to the point of using DHCP on my Ethernet adapter to continue.

I’ll check the documentation to find out how I might get further but this is the best attempt so far within the Android OS—compatible collection.

Eureka…?

I’ve finally gotten the live boot to work by sneakily removing the Ethernet connection in order to get past the Google Play Service screen. It has an interesting interface that looks a lot like a cellphone might. So I’ve decided to boot again and actually install this time.

I’ve managed to navigate around the interface a bit during the live boot session. Oddly-enough, you get to a terminal screen with the Ctrl-Alt-F1 screen and back to the GUI with Ctrl-Alt-F7. There’s a very thin setup of UNIX under the covers and some familiar commands if you are savvy to such things.

It appears to be a little heavy-handed with the processor fan control, in my humble opinion. There are many times when the fan is adjusted to full while it’s doing anything. For example, it’s blaring away while presumably formatting the first drive.

The installation process is shy on status. I couldn’t honestly tell you how much of the drive is formatted at the moment, for example. In old Western movies the Indian scout would put his ear to the ground in order to hear distant horses. Here, I put my ear to the side of the chassis in an attempt to hear whether or not the drive is being written to. Color me “worried”.

If At First You Don’t Succeed…

Okay, that didn’t work. So I reboot, reformat but this time without GRUB. It now appears to be going further.

Android OS starts up at least. I does still throw an error that Google Play service is stopped, like before. Like before, I need to temporarily disconnect the Ethernet cable to get past the same bug as seen during the live boot attempt.

Finally booting from the hard drive results in Error: no such partition, entering rescue mode, Grub rescue>. Really?

I think we need to vote Android OS off the island as a viable solution.

And yet…

I just keep imagining that this will work. So now I’m trying again with the previous (perhaps more stable) version of Android OS x86 5.1 rc1. This version plows right through the previous installation bug involving the Ethernet adapter, always a good sign. And the browser actually comes up without crashing, another bonus.

Finally, I’ve managed to find a working version of an Android OS for a PC. I’ll continue my review in depth and follow-up with what I find.

phoenix os

Continuing the testing of replacement operating systems I next attempted to install Phoenix OS of Beijing Chaozhuo Technology Co. Unfortunately that failed during the multiple attempts to get the installer onto the USB drive. I’m not sure what format they’re looking for but it errors out with a message complaining about NTFS partitions. I attempted using the FAT and FAT32 styles but neither made the installer happy.

Again, it looks like we’ll need to pass on another Android-like operating system for PCs.

remix os, part 2

Well, that didn’t work. As you might recall from my last post, I was attempting to install Remix OS onto a Dell Vostro 200 computer for testing purposes. It seemed to show activity on the USB drive so I let it run all night.

I interrupted it this morning since it was still on the pulsing Remix OS logo screen. And then when I attempted to use GPartEd to delete any unwanted disk partitions I found to my great surprise that there were no partitions to be found. The 64-bit version of the Remix OS installation from USB was essentially a total fail.

Next, I attempted to get the 32-bit version loaded onto the USB drive but that didn’t seem to complete, leaving the USB drive empty. Guess we’ll pass on Remix OS for now.

windows 10 “free upgrade” is over

Bummer. We had a year to upgrade from Windows 7/8 to the latest Windows 10 for free and we missed it. It’s not because we’re lazy. Sometimes it’s just because I.T. is under-funded and it literally takes all of our time to do other things. A fraction of those workstations only had 2GB of RAM, for example, and couldn’t be updated. And sometimes you have a collection of Windows XP computers that didn’t quality for the update.

So here you are, August 2016 and you have several aging computers that may or may not be worth the $$ to pay for the Windows 10 license. If you’re anything like me then you review alternatives.

MaaS (metal-as-a-service)

One very cool option that you can do with a pile of old Dell Vostro 200 workstations is to convert them into a private cloud. I recently did just this. Imagine a rack of computers—all without monitors/keyboards/mice—and they all do something you rarely see: they boot over the network via Ethernet to pull down an image you’ve setup. Once you’ve set everything up it’s wonderfully automatic. The name of the collection of services is called Openstack.

What’s even better is that once each node has fully provisioned itself with an image, it goes to sleep, turning itself off. And then the cluster control can wake it up remotely over Ethernet and it goes to work again.

And the best of all is that the entire thing is free from a software standpoint. (Free is good.) Note that for the default installation you’ll need a spare Ethernet hub/switch, one of the computers needs to have two Ethernet adapters and at least five of the computers will need double hard drives. Since I had so many spare computers I just cannibalized where necessary.

If you’re interested in reviewing this as well, check out this link on Ubuntu’s website. Once you’re finished you’ll have a system in which you can spin up virtual computers and allocate them as you wish. You may securely remote into these virtual computers using the putty software client. If you’ve configured it to use public IP addresses you can even publish websites, for example.

The version that I reviewed was a few back from the current release and hopefully everything is much more stable now. I noted then that it wasn’t quite ready for “prime time” but I’d guess that it’s ready to go by now.

Ubuntu Server or Desktop

Even if you don’t go all the way and create a private cloud you can always just install the free Ubuntu operating system as a server or a desktop computer. It seems to be a very usable collection of well-maintained code. Canonical is the company behind this effort.

Remix OS

And today I’m trying something I’ve just discovered called the Remix OS for PC. It’s essentially the Android operating system for smartphones, just setup especially for a standard computer. Jide Technology appears to be the underlying developer.

At the one-hour mark: Things looked good for the first fifteen minutes or so of the installation. Unfortunately, after an hour I would guess that it’s possibly stuck. The Dell Vostro 200 appears to have an acceptable graphics adapter (Intel GMA 3100) and yet I still don’t have a full installation yet. Since the status light on the USB drive does still randomly blink perhaps it’s just taking a very long time. I’ll not interrupt it and see what happens.

At the two-hour mark: I’m still staring at the same pulsing Remix OS logo. The status light seems to indicate that progress is still happening or so I’d hope.

End-of-day: At this point I think I’m going to just let it run all night if it wants and see if it’s finished in the morning.