da plane

Obviously, I watched too much television growing up. Every week on Fantasy Island, Hervé Villachaize’s character would point to the sky and make this exclamation.

da-plane

In a 3D printer, it’s really important to start printing on a known, flat plane. And yet, many print beds aren’t made of something rigid like glass so bigger parts end up shaped like the print bed itself. Even small deviations can mess up a print. It’s a problem to be solved, actually.

OctoPrint

The software that’s running on my Robo C2 printer is a fork of the popular OctoPrint open-source software. What’s cool about this software is that it will allow you to write plugins to adjust the way it works.

GCODE

The language the printer listens to during the print job is called GCODE. Think of it as a list of common instructions that almost all 3D printers use now.

Autoleveling

One of the GCODE commands in question is G29 and this tells the printer to run through an autoleveling routine. In some cases, the printer’s extruder will actually touch the print bed in several locations. In others, the extruder assembly will use a light plus a photoresistor to hover above the bed and to gauge its height above it. Using either method, the printer can make a reasonable “map” of the print bed and mathematically create a virtual plane to represent it. If the print bed is a little lower on one side, this routine should allow the printer to compensate for that.

Only…, it doesn’t really work that great, to be honest. Someone deserves a round of applause for trying to fix the problem but honestly, a manual approach is possibly the better way to go here.

Although these printers have a built-in autoleveling feature, manually leveling the print bed is preferred by those who are more advanced at 3D printing.

The Problem

I’m currently now working to manually adjust my print bed so that it is perfectly level and an exact height from the extruder. In fact, I have two replaceable print beds for the same printer so both of them need to be perfectly level and exactly the same height all around. To complicate matters, I anticipate designing and creating a third print bed for this which is heated. And that one should also be perfectly level and the same height as the others. The final goal will be to easily and quickly swap print beds without the task of fussing with any settings.

So now, having created a number of GCODE files over the last four months, I really don’t feel like editing them to remove that unnecessary G29 command. Once you’ve manually leveled everything, an autolevel routine is not only overkill but it can cause problems to the print quality. I needed a way of programmatically switching off the command when seen.

The Solution

I’ve created an OctoPrint plugin which helps to solve this problem. Assuming that I no longer need autoleveling at the start of each job, the plugin tells the printer basically to ignore any G29 commands. I now don’t have to edit countless GCODE files or worry if someone sends me a file—the printer will dutifully ignore this command.

Github:  Toggle Autolevel plugin

 

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