ubuntu core on the raspberry pi 3

The fun just never stops here as I begin with a new operating system on a second microSD for my newly-purchased Raspberry Pi 3. This time, it’s Ubuntu Core. This operating system from Ubuntu appears to be a big departure from the Ubuntu server or desktop versions I’m used to. In case you were wondering, I managed to install the new operating system with little trouble. It’s different, though, I’ll be the first to admit it.

Goodbye apt-get, hello snap…

Gone is the usual apt or apt-get interface for fetching code. It’s been replaced completely by snap. Honestly, apt has been the mainstay command for managing Ubuntu (and Linux) for a while now so this is quite the departure from the norm. Snap, in theory, will be a cross-Linux way of deploying code. From my initial research, it appears to be a lot like the Juju Charms for deploying services on a Metal-as-a-Service (MaaS) system. Like Charms, Snaps appear to have an up-stream and down-stream component to them, providers and consumers, if you will.

On the positive side of things, a Snap that you create would work on many different systems. In this way, it works a bit like Java or .net (somewhere, there’s an interpretive layer for the particular hardware but you don’t have to worry about that). Presumably, you mostly just worry about the interface you’re providing and the packaging requirements to create a Snap for submission to the store.

Since Snaps get digitally signed this makes them more like the Apple iTunes store metaphor that Microsoft, Google and everyone else seems to be going with these days. Digitally signing your programs both lowers the risk of rogue/evil code out there but it also puts a middleman into your money stream—someone like Apple will be there to charge the publisher a fee for making money on the store and for signing your developer’s certificate each year. At the moment, Canonical (the maker of Ubuntu) doesn’t charge for a Single-Sign On account but maybe if this becomes popular they will in the future.

Honestly, the entire concept of Snaps appears to be a watered-down clone of Apple’s iTunes distribution model.

Fee Structure for their Store

Not that this information is easily available, I managed to finally find it. From this page on Canonical’s website:

4. Pricing, fees and payment

  1. If you elect to distribute an App without charge, the payment terms of this Agreement will not apply with respect to the free App.

  2. If you set a price for your App we will collect fees from end users that purchase your App at the price you set. Within 30 days of the end of each calendar quarter, we will provide you with a report of the number of copies of each of your Apps sold and the amount of any payment due, which shall be the fee multiplied by the number of copies sold less any applicable taxes and our commission. Our commission is 20% of the total fees charged for the sale of your App, less any applicable taxes.

So they’re charging 20% commission for brokering your Snap. Compare this to Google’s flat 30% commission, Apple’s flat 30% commission plus $100/year developer license and Microsoft’s 30% commission plus $49/year developer license. Note that there are precious few Snaps available. Specifically, only one Snap has a price of $1 at this time and the remaining 547 are free. So until others are charging for their Snaps, don’t expect to make a dime selling yours, in other words. In a free world, nobody will open their wallet nor expect to.

The Future of Snaps

It’s difficult to say whether this entire concept will get traction. Linux has been the free alternative. The people who run Ubuntu, for example, like that aspect about the community. Will these people easily change their stripes and embrace a payment system in the future in which we pay for code? Remember, we’re talking about people who’d rather build from source instead of paying for a binary file. My gut tells me that they’re never going to go for it.

Should I Invest Time in Developing Snaps?

As a developer, having a variety of experience looks good on your résumé so yes, by all means, develop a Snap. And since we developers often communicate our value via our github page I’d suggest that these Snaps be free and open-source if possible.

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