raspberry pi 3 with node.js

First day with the Raspberry Pi 3 and I’m already having way too much fun with this! Today, I decided to see how fast I could get a Node.js—based webserver running on it and was not disappointed.

Out-of-the-box it comes with the NOOBS installation manager at bootup which politely asks you to install an operating system from the selection. I chose the default Raspian operating system because it’s basically a Debian project and well-trusted.

My task was made simpler because I’d purchased one of the Raspberry Pi 3 kits which included a microSD card pre-loaded with NOOBS. I’d suggest doing the same since the markup over a standard 16GB microSD wasn’t much, to be honest. The empty Raspberry Pi 3 board costs about $35 these days but the kit at $60 includes the NOOBS-preloaded microSD and a 5V power adapter. My kit also included a basic/clear case but I opted for a $9 red case which seems to be more standard.

Setup

For the initial setup, you need spare Ethernet and HDMI-to-DVI cables, USB mouse, USB keyboard and a monitor. Everything gets plugged in before adding the power adapter to boot it.

One thing to note if you’ve just purchased one and are confused, you’ll need to remove the microSD adapter from the included SD adapter before inserting the former into the Pi. They include the larger SD adapter because some people might need that, in theory, to insert it into their workstation if the need arrives. Store the adapter for future use.

microsd

I found that the latest release of Raspian somewhat hides the wi-fi configuration compared to earlier versions. You’ll find what you need by left-mouse clicking the network symbol in the upper taskbar. I also found it necessary to manually edit the /etc/network/interfaces file in a terminal session to change the wi-fi from manual to dhcp. I would imagine that subsequent versions of Raspian will fix this however, you might not be able to easily update the operating system until you’ve achieved a working network connection in the first place.

Headless Boot

Confirming that the networking was happy, I shutdown the Pi, removed everything but the power adapter and booted it again, doing everything next remotely via ssh or RDP.  First I updated the software via a terminal session and then installed tightvncserver, xrdp and samba. I configured a shared drive for use later in /etc/samba/smb.conf file and created a Samba network user for the default pi operating system user. Next, I tested remote connectivity from both a Mac and a Windows-based computer and all looked good for the share.

Next, I installed Node.js globally from a Nodesource.com—based distribution as well as the express-generator. I created a ~/share/sites subfolder and then used Express to generate a new hello application below this. I then started up the newly-created website.  Fortunately, the Samba client recently installed publishes its own hostname to the DHCP server so that I could then surf the website from Windows without knowing its IP address as seen here. The default port for an Express website is 3000, btw.

raspberrypi_webserver

Since I’d created a network share earlier I simply edited the default Express-generated files using Wordpad on my Windows—based computer remotely.

What Next?

From here, I’ll likely be investigating earlier projects like the magnetic card swipe visitor station to convert it to using a Raspberry Pi 3 instead of a larger workstation. By adding a USB-based drive you could likely repeat the earlier Kloudspeaker project with a much smaller footprint.

I intend to create a squad of four Raspberry Pi 3’s in a housing which includes an Ethernet switch, a common power supply and a fan all in a self-contained housing which promotes good airflow and optional stacking. In this case, I’d need to change over to an Ubuntu operating system, I think, since some of the provisioning tools there might make something like this easier. I’ll ultimately have a supercomputer for a fraction of the cost of what you might expect to pay.

In a follow-up post, I’ll be discussing my attempts to install and evaluate the Ubuntu Core for the Raspberry Pi 3 operating system using a second microSD which I purchased for this purpose.

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